sepas langdon street

Discuss Hispanic gangs, Southsiders, Sureños in LOS ANGELES COUNTY ONLY. There are four general geographic categories Hispanic gangs fall into for LA.
istekse818
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sepas langdon street

Unread post by istekse818 » August 14th, 2014, 5:13 pm

is sepas 13 the same as sepas langdon street ?if so how old were they and what happened?

heres a article about the sepas langdon street in the la times
i noticed they didnt have their own post on here so i thought i post it up with some la times articles from the 90s with SEPAS LANGDON STREET history

LA TIMES


Before they were a gang, the Langdon boys were a football team.

One day a player from Blythe Street tackled a Langdon player too roughly. That started the trouble with Blythe. With Columbus Street, it was over football, or a girl. Nobody's sure anymore. All they know is, pretty soon the Langdon boys had grudges against everybody else and everybody had a grudge against them.


They may not know exactly how all the trouble started, but everyone knows the instant when gangsterism, Langdon-style, became more than a thrilling contest to outwit the cops and taunt rivals by dumping tomatoes on their street.

That was the afternoon Casper died. He was the first to die by the gun, and it broke the neighborhood's heart. It also broke Langdon's luck. After that, as if a karmic levee had been breached, death gushed onto Orion Avenue.

There was Woody, stabbed by a drunk. Crazy killed himself, as he predicted, playing Russian roulette. Blanca was shot in the mouth by a San Fernando gang. Chato was gunned down on his way to church. There were Leon, Gordo, Downer, Joker. And finally, Pee Nut, a mischievous artist who climbed onto the roof of Langdon Avenue Elementary School one yule season and wrote, "Have a Pee Nutty Christmas."

Almost all are buried at the San Fernando Mission Cemetery, not much more than a pistol shot from where the young men died in defense of streets they didn't own, at the hands of enemies they didn't know.

About 30 members of the gang gathered there one Sunday to celebrate Casper's birthday. Coronas were popped and poured on the unmarked grave. Ashamed that, six years after his death, Casper lay in obscurity, they heatedly renewed pledges to raise $2,000 for a headstone.

Tupac Shakur's anthem of gang life and death thumped softly in the background, like a spirit drum calling to the dead. "How many brothers fell victim to the streets?" Tupac asked.

The answer is 10, and counting.

From Boys to Men

If the Langdon neighborhood has a matriarch, someone who could tell the story of the gang, it might be Casper's mother, Olivia Trejo. A wiry, 40-year-old construction worker with rough hands and sun-worn features, she watched Nathan--his real name--and his friends grow from marble-playing children into drug dealers and gangsters.

"I wasn't there for neither one of my kids. I was in and out of prison so much," she said in a flat, colorless voice that neither begged forgiveness nor tried to shrug off the blame.

She sat smoking at the kitchen table in the tiny, simply furnished apartment on Langdon Avenue that she shared with her sister, Gloria. While she talked, gang members walked in and out in their baggy uniforms. Livy, as they called her, watched the parade and admitted responsibility for the wreckage in her life.

What it came down to, first, last and always, was that she just liked getting high. Still did.

"I grew up in the hippie era. I was taking acid at 11.

"Not due to my parents," she added quickly. "They provided everything for us."

Her father always worked and her mother was there for her. But drugs didn't mean the same thing then. At least, it did not seem that way to her. "I tell the boys, we used to kick back and smoke a joint," she said.

She paused, blew a jet of smoke out the side of her thin-lipped mouth and drifted back, remembering how you could just go up to strangers and get a hit and not worry about what neighborhood they were from. You were all part of the same neighborhood, anyway, the one straights didn't visit.

"We created a culture," she said. "We believed in peace and love."

Snapping back to the present, she spread her arms to embrace all the pathology of gangbanging and crack that had swallowed her candy-colored dream, a sour look creasing her face. "This is their culture," she said, and they have never known anything else.

When Livy moved to the neighborhood nearly 20 years ago, there was no gang. It was a working-class and college student enclave. The neighborhood started going downhill while the boys were still small. The Langdon boys learned to cut up rock cocaine from the black drug dealers on the street. After a series of violent confrontations in the late 1980s, the Langdon boys drove off the blacks and took over.

The drug money opened up a world of luxury to the boys. They were too young to own cars so they filled their closets with Reeboks and adorned their girlfriends with gold.

Livy is proud that she never asked her son for money, as other parents did. Carlos, 16, tithes $20 a day to his parents to help with the bills and rent. "Everybody does sin," he explained. "If I need to keep the family up, it's not sin."

Livy was between jail cells the day Casper died. It was especially ironic because there was a moment there that things might have turned out differently.


part 1

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Re: sepas langdon street

Unread post by femun » August 14th, 2014, 8:58 pm

Langdon Street is in North Hills, well up until 1992 North hills was known as Sepulveda. Some of the guys from Sepulveda(gang members and regular guys)wanted to be like the guys from Pacoima,San Fer,Van Nuys North Hollywood and attach themselves to a city so they started using the term Sepas but it never caught on.

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Re: sepas langdon street

Unread post by judastaugamma » August 15th, 2014, 12:35 am

lst claims sepas but i think there was sepas before them.

kihda like say pacoima van nuys boys claiming pacas but the original pacas was what pacoima 13? pacoima flats?

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Re: sepas langdon street

Unread post by istekse818 » August 19th, 2014, 2:40 am

judastaugamma wrote:lst claims sepas but i think there was sepas before them.

kihda like say pacoima van nuys boys claiming pacas but the original pacas was what pacoima 13? pacoima flats?

i know what u mean and thats what im wondering too cause rumor has is that their was a sepas 13 before a langdon street
so im wondering what happened to sepas 13 or if it even existed or its like femun is saying and it was made to put a city behind but it didnt catch on .. :?: :?:


i personally believe sepas 13 is sepas langdon st but what do i know? i wasnt around....................

Part 2

At her son's urging, she was making plans to move out of the neighborhood. Casper, 15, a handsome boy with his mother's fine features and too many girlfriends to count, was tiring of the gang life. He asked his mother to drive him to local colleges to watch the students rushing to class. "That's gonna be me, mom," Casper said.

On the afternoon of Nov. 3, 1990, Casper asked his mother for money to go to a party. He walked out on the street and a car pulled up. The occupants supposedly shouted, "Valerio Street!"

"This is Langdon!" replied Casper, walking over to the car. He fired first, some said, but his gun jammed. The intruders in the car shot him and two others. He was the only one to die.

Livy's second son, Armando, is in jail for shooting his cousin, the son of Livy's other sister, Martha. The shooting took place in a motel room where Martha Trejo was packing for Las Vegas to get her family away from L.A.'s gangs.



SKRAPPYS STORY


orhoods
(Page 2 of 5)
Gang Life's Grip Proves Hard to Escape
Members talk about changing their lives, but breaking away is easier said than done. Parents, meanwhile, wonder what went wrong.
May 27, 1997|JOHN JOHNSON and CAROLYN COLE | TIMES STAFF WRITERS



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At her son's urging, she was making plans to move out of the neighborhood. Casper, 15, a handsome boy with his mother's fine features and too many girlfriends to count, was tiring of the gang life. He asked his mother to drive him to local colleges to watch the students rushing to class. "That's gonna be me, mom," Casper said.

On the afternoon of Nov. 3, 1990, Casper asked his mother for money to go to a party. He walked out on the street and a car pulled up. The occupants supposedly shouted, "Valerio Street!"

"This is Langdon!" replied Casper, walking over to the car. He fired first, some said, but his gun jammed. The intruders in the car shot him and two others. He was the only one to die.

Livy's second son, Armando, is in jail for shooting his cousin, the son of Livy's other sister, Martha. The shooting took place in a motel room where Martha Trejo was packing for Las Vegas to get her family away from L.A.'s gangs.

"The first time we moved to Langdon was '78 or '79," Livy recalled. "We haven't been able to get out of Langdon yet."

Some Langdon gangsters do manage to get out, she said, especially the older ones with mouths to feed. They get religion, find a straight job and try to settle down. But they have never done anything with their lives. The only work they can get is menial.

"They live on the line of poverty," she said. "They may move out of the neighborhood, but they don't get far."

As much as Livy admitted her own failures, she earnestly wanted to believe something larger was at work. When she was young, there were gang members, but not so many, not like this. It maybe had to do with drugs and uninvolved parents, but there was a lot more besides that she couldn't get into words.

"Something is wrong with us," she said. "We're not building something right."

Skrappy's Story

Skrappy, whose real name is John Aguilar, was the leader of the Langdon gang, a fact that took us weeks to discover. Because gang members like to think everyone is equal, leaders are careful not to act the part.

The gang cops had pegged another man as the leader. But it was Skrappy who called the Sunday meetings and ordered beatings for those who broke his rules. One day, his assistants beat 10 of their own in the middle of Orion Avenue, hospitalizing one, for showing up late to a meeting.

A stocky man with piercing eyes, Skrappy dressed simply, in a watch cap and sweatshirt, with a single gold chain around his neck. His analytical manner was well-suited to the small businessman he was--and the antithesis of the cliched, dressed-down gangster who calls everyone "homes."

Leading a street gang wasn't what Skrappy expected to be doing at age 25. After high school he attended Valley College, trying to leave the gangster life. He landed a $25-an-hour construction job on the Metro Rail project, had a townhouse, dental care for his wife, money in the bank. A regular life.

"I was going straight as an arrow," he said one afternoon over lunch in a Mexican restaurant in the neighborhood.

He only went back to Orion one day several years ago to visit friends. It was just bad luck that an enemy drove up and shot him in the throat.

Instead of causing him to put the gangster life behind him, his brush with death propelled him back to the one world he knew: the four littered blocks that Langdon claims as its territory. He was arrested for drug sales, lost his green card and was deported to Mexico.

Now he was back running the neighborhood, one of only three veterans left from the old days when the gang began. "Fifteen of us started this," he said, reeling off the names from memory.

There was a sad solemnity to the recitation, because most of the names belonged to people who were dead or in prison. "We're like the last of the Mohicans," Skrappy said of himself and the other two original members, Sal Saldana, 21, and Midget, 20.

Skrappy had a kind of calm self-assurance that would have made him stand out in any crowd, not just among gangsters. Just beneath the surface, however, was a brittle fatalism.

"You never stop being who you are," he said. His own experience taught him that. Casper's death taught him that. His girlfriend Carmen, killed in a drive-by, taught him that.

"I can't focus because there's too many problems in my head," he said at one point.

This should have been a particularly good time to take the reins of the Langdon gang. The San Fernando Valley's 3-year-old peace treaty among Latino gangs had been a boon to the gang's drug business. They didn't have to worry anymore about rivals shooting up their streets and driving off customers.

"They got it easy now," laughed one gang member, just out of jail. "All they do is kick it and make money."

Still, there were problems. Gang membership was soaring, but many of the new recruits were hotheads who didn't see why they should make nice with old rivals like Blythe and Columbus.

Skrappy, a vocal supporter of the peace treaty, said the younger generation was hard to control...................

TBC

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Re: sepas langdon street

Unread post by SHYSTER » August 20th, 2014, 9:08 pm

I would put Sepas and Sol Trece in the same category. Older gangs that died out when the youngsters formed a newer gang. Kinda like what happened with Fickett St and KAM in East Los. For Sepas, it was Langdon St. For Sol Trece, it was Vineland Boys.

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Re: sepas langdon street

Unread post by istekse818 » December 21st, 2018, 2:02 am

i saw a picture from the 80s with some langdon street gangsters under the tag

LBZ - langdon boyz

when did they go from langdon boyz LBZ to sepas langdon street

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