THE ARYAN BROTHERHOOD & THE MEXICAN MAFIA ALLIANCE

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THE ARYAN BROTHERHOOD & THE MEXICAN MAFIA ALLIANCE

Unread post by OGXCHAOSX216XGANG » May 26th, 2009, 6:33 pm

Mexican Mafia
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Mexican Mafia
In Deuel Vocational Institution, California, United States
Founded by Luis "Huero Buff" Flores
Years active 1957–present
Territory US federal prison system and Southern California
Ethnicity Latino (mainly Mexican-American)
Membership 50,000+[citation needed]
Criminal activities Murder conspiracy, weapon trafficking, drug trafficking, racketeering, witness intimidation, extortion and gambling
Allies Sureños[1],Armenian Power, Aryan Brotherhood[1][2], Mexikanemi[1], Arizona's Old Mexican Mafia[1], New Mexico Syndicate[1], Varrio Hawaiian Gardens[3]
Rivals Nuestra Familia[1][4][5], Black Guerrilla Family[1][5], Arizona's New Mexican Mafia[1], Texas Syndicate[1], black street gangs[1][6], Northern Structure[1]

The Mexican Mafia, also known as La eMe (Spanish for the letter M) is an American originated mostly Mexican-American criminal organization, and is one of the oldest and most powerful prison gangs in the United States. l[7][8][2]
Contents
[hide]

* 1 History
* 2 Criminal activities
* 3 Membership
* 4 Allies and rivals
* 5 Symbols
* 6 In popular culture
* 7 See also
* 8 References
* 9 External links

[edit] History

The Mexican Mafia was formed in the late 1950s by Chicano street gang members incarcerated at the Deuel Vocational Institution, a state prison located in Tracy, California.[7]

The foundation of the gang began with thirteen members of the Maravilla gang. These thirteen prisoners that laid the groundwork for the gang referred to themselves as Mexikanemi, which is translated from Nahuatl as "He Who walks with God in his heart."[7] The initial founding member of the gang was Luis "Huero Buff" Flores, who was previously a member of the Hawaiian Gardens gang.[9]

While the Mexican Mafia was founded in part to show reverence to Aztec and Maya heritage, its primary focus was to protect members against other prison inmates as well as corrections officers.[7] Deuel Vocational Institution was treated as an educational facility by convicts, where they would develop their skills in fighting, drug dealing, and creating weapons.[7]

Luis Flores initially recruited violent members to the gang, in an attempt to create a highly-feared organization which could control the black market activities of the Deuel prison facilities.[9] As a response to the increase in violence, the California Department of Corrections transferred some members of the Mexican Mafia to other prison facilities, including San Quentin Prison. This action inadvertently helped the Mexican Mafia in recruiting new members in both the prison and juvenile correctional facilities in California.[9]

In the late 1960s, Mexican-American (Chicano) inmates of the California state prison began to form a rival group to the Mexican Mafia, known as Nuestra Familia.[10] Membership was often determined according to the locations of their hometowns (the north-south dividing line generally accepted as Bakersfield, California.)

There was a perceived level of abuse by members of the Mexican Mafia towards the imprisoned Latinos from rural farming areas of Northern California.[11] The spark that led to the ongoing war between Nuestra Familia and members of the Mexican Mafia involved a situation in which a member of La Eme allegedly stole a pair of shoes from a Northerner. This event put into motion the longest-running gang war in the state of California.[11]

[edit] Criminal activities

The Mexican Mafia is an organization involved in extortion, drug trafficking, and murder, both in and outside the prison system.[7] According to the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Mexican Mafia had arranged for contract killings to be carried out by the Aryan Brotherhood, a white prison gang. Both the Mexican Mafia and the Aryan Brotherhood are mutual enemies of the African-American gang Black Guerilla Family.[12]

The first prison gang street execution in Los Angeles was committed by the Mexican Mafia in 1971.[9] Responsible for the murder was a white Maravilla gang member named Joe "Pegleg" Morgan. Morgan was well respected within the ranks of the Mexican Mafia and became a high ranking member. His connections with cocaine and heroin suppliers in Mexico helped pave the foundation for the Mexican Mafia's narcotics distribution throughout California.[9]During the 1970s, while under the control of Rudy Cadena, the Mexican Mafia often took control over various community groups. The gang was able to filter money from alcohol and drug prevention programs to finance their criminal activities.[9]

In 1995, United States federal authorities indicted 22 members and associates of the Mexican Mafia, charged under the federal Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act with crimes which included extortion, murder and kidnapping.[13] One of the arrested members, Benjamin "Topo" Peters, was allegedly the Mexican Mafia's highest ranking member, and was engaged in a power struggle with fellow member Ruben "Tupi" Hernandez.[13] Another indicted member was accused of having plotted the death of an anti-gang activist who served as a consultant for the film American Me. The indictments marked a two-year investigation by federal, local and state law enforcement officials.[13]

In 2006, a 36-count federal indictment was brought against members of the Mexican Mafia. The arrests were made for alleged acts of violence, drug dealing, and extortion against smaller Latino street gangs.[14] According to the federal indictment, Mexican Mafia members exert their influence in both federal and state prison systems through either violence or the threat of violence.[14]

Members and associates of the gang remain fiercely loyal to the criminal organization both in and outside of prison, particularly in Southern California cities such as Los Angeles and San Diego. The gang asserts its influence over other gangs throughout Southern California by threatening violence against their members should they ever become incarcerated. Gangs and drug dealers who refuse to pay a protection "tax" to the Mexican Mafia are often murdered or threatened with murder.[14] High-ranking members of the Mexican Mafia who are locked in private cells for 23 hours of each day are still able to communicate with their associates, through methods which range from tapping in code on prison plumbing pipes to smuggled letters.[14]

[edit] Membership

While the Mexican Mafia is a highly-organized criminal entity, it is believed that the gang presently is not presided over by a single leader.[14] Prison membership of the gang is believed to consist of at least 150 members with authority to order murders, and at least 1000 associates who can carry out those orders.[14] It is estimated that the Mexican Mafia has over 30,000 members throughout the United States.[8]

Modeled after the Sicilian Mafia in the United States,[9] the Mexican Mafia operates on a paramilitary structure, including generals, captains, lieutenants and sergeants. Those ranking below the sergeants are considered soldiers, sometimes referred to as "carnales."[8]

Members of the Mexican Mafia are expected to engage in tests of their loyalty to the gang, which may include theft or murder. The penalty for refusing orders or failing to complete an assigned task is often death.[8] According to the gang's constitution, members may also be punished or murdered if they commit any of four major infractions. These include becoming an informant, acts of homosexuality, acts of cowardice, and showing disrespect against fellow gang members.[8] According to gang policy, a member of the Mexican Mafia may not be murdered without prior approval by a vote of three members, yet the murder of non-members requires no formal approval.[8]

During the early 1960s at San Quentin Prison, Luis Flores and Rudy "Cheyenne" Cadena established a blood oath for members of the Mexican Mafia.[9] Prior to the establishment of the oath, members of the Mexican Mafia were allowed to return to their street gangs after incarceration. The new oath stipulated that the only way for a member to leave the Mexican Mafia was to be killed.[9] Flores and Cadena also established a set of gang commandments.[9] These included policies such as: a new member must be sponsored by an existing member, unanimous approval from all existing members to join (no longer policy), prioritizing the gang over one's family, denial of the existence of the Mexican Mafia to law enforcement or non-members, disrespect of other members, forgiving street conflicts which existed before incarceration. Execution of a member of the gang for policy violation must be committed by the gang member who sponsored him.[9]

While mostly found in California, the Mexican Mafia has a membership which extends to other states including Texas, Arizona, and New Mexico.[7]

[edit] Allies and rivals

The Mexican Mafia holds a strong alliance with the Aryan Brotherhood. The primary rivals of the Mexican Mafia are Nuestra Familia.[15] The Mexican Mafia is also a rival of the Black Guerrilla Family prison gang, which holds a loose alliance with Nuestra Familia.[15]

[edit] Symbols

Mexican Mafia symbols include images of a black hand.[14] The gang's primary symbol, which is often used in tattoos by members, is the national symbol of Mexico (eagle and a snake) atop a flaming circle over crossed knives.[8]

Members of the Mexican Mafia often use the number 13 as gang identification, as the letter "M" is the 13th letter of the English alphabet.[9]

[edit] In popular culture

The Mexican Mafia received mainstream notoriety after being featured in the 1992 movie American Me. The film was coproduced, directed and starred in by actor Edward James Olmos, who allegedly received death threats by members of the Mexican Mafia for what they considered an unflattering depiction of the gang.[16] Two consultants for the film were murdered shortly after the film's release.[16] The Mexican Mafia was allegedly displeased with the portrayal of the murder of Rodolfo Cadena (who was the basis for Olmos' character Santana) as being committed by his fellow gang members.[16] Olmos subsequently applied for a concealed handgun permit, which was denied to him.[17]

Joe "Pegleg" Morgan, while serving a life sentence for murder at Pelican Bay State Prison, filed a $500,000 lawsuit against Olmos, Universal Studios and other producers of the film. Morgan claimed that one of the principal characters in the film was based on him without obtaining his permission.[16]

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Re: THE ARYAN BROTHERHOOD & THE MEXICAN MAFIA ALLIANCE

Unread post by OGXCHAOSX216XGANG » May 26th, 2009, 6:34 pm

Aryan Brotherhood
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Aryan Brotherhood

In San Quentin State Prison, California
Years active 1964-present
Territory federal prison system, California, Texas, Ohio and Arizona
Ethnicity White
Membership 15,000+
Criminal activities Murder, Conspiracy, Drug trafficking, Racketeering, Dog fighting
Allies Mexican Mafia,[1] Nazi Lowriders,[2] Hells Angels[1]
Rivals Black Guerrilla Family,[1] Nuestra Familia,[1] D.C. Blacks[2]

The Aryan Brotherhood, also known as the AB or The Brand, is a White prison gang numbering about 15,000[3] members in and out of prison.[4] In March 2006, four leaders of the Aryan Brotherhood were indicted for numerous crimes, including murder, conspiracy, drug trafficking, racketeering, and dog fighting.[4] According to the FBI, although the gang makes up less than 1% of the prison population, it is responsible for up to 18% of murders in the federal prison system.[5][6]
Contents
[hide]

* 1 History
* 2 Organization
* 3 References in popular culture
* 4 See also
* 5 References
* 6 External links

[edit] History

Until the 1960s, most prisons in the United States were racially segregated. As prisons began to desegregate, inmates organized along racial lines.[6] The Aryan Brotherhood is believed to have been formed by a group of bikers in 1964 at San Quentin State Prison,[4] with prosecutors of cases against the gang saying it was formed in reaction to the Black Panthers.[7] It may have been derived from or inspired by a previous entity, the Bluebird Gang.[4] Originally its membership was exclusively Irish American[7] and most of its activities were racially-based, but over time the gang became more profit-driven and began to incorporate other white and even mixed-race members.[4]

On June 23, 2005, after a 20-month investigation, a federal strike force raided six houses in northeastern Ohio belonging to the "Order of the Blood", a criminal organization controlled by the Aryan Brotherhood. Thirty-four Aryan Brotherhood members or associates were arrested and warrants were issued for ten more.[6]

Also in 2005, culminating an eight year investigation, federal prosecutors indicted forty members of the organization, thirty of whom were already incarcerated, for a wide variety of crimes. Prosecuting the gang has been historically difficult, because many members are already serving life sentences with no possibility of parole, so prosecutors were seeking the death penalty for twenty-one of those indicted but have dropped the death penalty on all but five defendants. By September of that year, the nineteen indictees not eligible for the death penalty had plead guilty.[6] The first of a series of trials involving four high level members ended in convictions in July 2006. Two of the four went through a death penalty hearing and the jury deadlocked. Before sentencing, federal prosecutors filed a request that once the sentencing was over, the four would live out their sentences in solitary confinement, banned from communicating with anyone except their attorneys. The judge refused to rule on the request, telling prosecutors to file it with the US Attorney General and they immediately withdrew. One was sentenced to four life terms, two were sentenced to three life terms, all without the possibility of parole, and one has yet to be sentenced. Some members are still awaiting trial.

[edit] Organization

Organization at lower levels varies from prison to prison. For example, in the Arizona prison system, members are known as "kindred" and organize into "families". A "council" controls the families. Kindred may recruit other members, known as "progeny", and serve as a mentor for the new recruit.[8]

Like most prison gangs, Aryan Brotherhood members mark themselves with distinctive tattoos. Designs commonly include the words "Aryan Brotherhood", the acronym "AB", 666, SS sig runes, spiderwebs near the elbow, shamrocks, and other Nazi and/or Celtic iconography.[5]

The AB has since focused on the economic activities typical of organized crime entities, particularly drug trafficking, extortion, inmate prostitution, and murder-for-hire. According to a recent federal indictment, the Brotherhood has partnered with Asian gangs to import heroin from Thailand. While incarcerated in Marion Federal Penitentiary in 1996, after being assaulted, Gambino crime family boss John Gotti is said to have asked Aryan Brotherhood members to murder his attacker, although the hit was unsuccessful.[5][9]

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Re: THE ARYAN BROTHERHOOD & THE MEXICAN MAFIA ALLIANCE

Unread post by OGXCHAOSX216XGANG » May 26th, 2009, 6:35 pm

Some Gang Members Can Go Straight
When an Aryan Brotherhood and Mexican Mafia snitch’s cover was blown, his real life began.

June 26, 2008

How you have fallen from heaven, O morning star, son of the dawn!
You have been cast down to the earth, you who once laid low the nations!
Isaiah 14:12

He was known as “Buzzard” or just “Buzz.” And he was a member of the Aryan Brotherhood Prison Gang and an associate of AB Council member John Stinson. Only his well-known addiction to heroin kept him from reaching a leadership role.

When Buzz was not living in one of California’s most notorious prisons or the L.A. County Jail, he resided in the Los Angeles suburb of Hawaiian Gardens. Because he grew up with Hispanic gang members and shot dope with them, he was also a close associate of the Hispanics in the Hawaiian Gardens gang. The Aryan Brotherhood gang was aligned with the Mexican Mafia and so Buzz became a friend of Mexican Mafia founder and Hawaiian Gardens gang member Luis “Huero Buff” Flores.

Buzz was a skinny 5-foot, 10-inch man with blond hair and blue eyes, and he was no saint.
He was arrested originally for a 1984 Torrance murder and became the longest continual county jail prisoner until 1992 when he was finally convicted of a separate 1990 assault and sent to San Luis Obispo prison.

He was also involved in drug dealing and all types of larceny, but he was not especially violent. Make no mistake, he had made his bones and could clearly defend himself if required. But what he was really good at was transport. Buzz was the “go to guy” for prison gangs when they needed to move dope or weapons in or out of the facility.

That talent with smuggling put Buzz in an excellent position to gain knowledge of the inner workings and plans of prison gangs. And that made him a very valuable source of intelligence.

So Buzz became a police informant while in custody in the late 1980s. Then when he was released from prison, he began working for my prison gang unit. For many years he provided valuable information on the criminal activities of both the AB and the Mexican Mafia.

In truth, his drug addiction probably contributed to his decision to cooperate, but soon after started cooperating, he formed a relationship with his law enforcement handlers. They used every legal tool and resource to avoid exposing Buzz or placing him in a position where he would be required to testify in court publicly. This working relationship became more of a friendship over the years.

On the street, Buzz earned his daily bread and daily heroin by buying and delivering drugs for other users. But his real “genius” was as a “booster.” A booster is a professional shoplifter. Buzz was an expert booster skilled in every aspect of shoplifting, including how to use boxes and bags, how to switch price tags, how to return boosted items to other stores for cash, and how to dertermine what and where to steal. Buzz specialized in boosting tools and sporting equipment. This was no small time operation; he often earned hundreds of dollars a day boosting.

Buzz's town, Hawaiian Gardens, had been a city patrolled by the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department for many years. However when the city wanted to open a gambling casino, sheriff’s officials opposed it. The city voted to end its contract with LASD and to establish its own police department. Local gang members “encouraged” businesses and citizens to approve the city’s gambling initiative. The Hawaiian Gardens gang was especially arrogant and aggressive toward any police patrol operating in the city. We nicknamed the city, “148 City.” That stood for California Penal Code section 148: “Obstructing and interfering with the duties of a police officer.” A Hawaiian Gardens city “gang worker” who had grown up with me in Compton told me that the city government was tied to drug- and gang-related individuals in the city. My old classmate was no angel himself, and was part of a local gang program operating in Hawaiian Gardens. The gang program was a fraud.

After passing the casino initiative, the city disbanded its police force and returned to its contract with the sheriff’s department. But the local city gang members continued to be emboldened by their hold on the little city.

When the sheriff’s department came back into Hawaiian Gardens, Buzz provided us with reliable information on drug dealing, on gang members, and on a conspiracy by one city official to murder another. But Buzz avoided giving up information on his friend and primary heroin connection, Luis “Huero Buff” Flores.

Luis “Huero Buff“ Flores was the founder of the Mexican Mafia prison gang and honored in the Hawaiian Gardens gang like a decorated war hero. He had avoided prison for almost a decade. He was not on probation or parole and seemingly untouchable by law enforcement. However even he had a weakness.

We were astounded when Huero Buff requested a secret meeting in a Lakewood park with a California Department of Corrections Special Services agent and the LASD Prison Gang Unit. We naturally suspected an ambush or some other deception, and stationed undercover officers all over that park. But when Flores arrived we could see that he was emotionally distressed.

Although the infamous Flores was the poster boy for Hispanic gangs, he had raised his son to avoid any associations with gangs or drugs. His son had become a successful student and football star at Cerritos High School. No Hispanic gang member would dare touch him. But Flores’ son had become entangled in a beef with Filipino gang members who threatened the boy’s life. That was why his father wanted to talk with us.

Huero Buff said he had thought about having the Filipino gang members killed, their homes shot up, or arming his son, but any way you sliced it there would be certain retaliation against his son and the family. He asked if there was any way for us to help his son out.

I asked Huero Buff for the names of the gang members that were threatening his son, but Flores said he could not do that. He could not provide information to the police (officially) against other gang members. He was clearly torn between his gang code of conduct and his laudable concern for his son’s safety. I saw tears form in his eyes, and they rolled slowly down his leathered cheeks. We all genuinely felt sorry for him. We parted then as respectful adversaries.

Sadly Luis Flores’s son was unable to avoid the inevitable confrontation with the Filipino gang members. I guess his eventual drug and gang involvement was also unavoidable. This is not what Huero Buff wanted for his son. He had spent 18 years trying to prevent his son falling into the hell he had made for himself. Frustrated and broken, Huero Buff Flores retreated into the world of heroin addiction.

Within a year, Buzz began expressing concern for his friend Huero Buff Flores. He felt that Flores had narrowly escaped overdosing several times and was very sick. Flores would remain at home sitting on the toilet with his pants pulled down, shooting heroin into his legs for several days at a time. He was not eating or involved in any everyday activities except shooting dope and nodding off on the toilet. Buzz felt that he would soon be dead.

Rumors had also begun to surface that Buzz was a police informant, so his life expectancy as a snitch was quickly fading. He was good for maybe one more caper.

So we devised a plan to make a heroin “buy-bust” on Huero Buff. He was a target because he was a heroin dealer, but also because of Buzz’s concern for his life. Buzz was just about the only person who could pull this off anyway. The buy was made. Flores handed the heroin to Buzz while sitting on that toilet. Then Prison Gang Unit Det. Frank Durazo wrote the warrants, and we quickly staged our raid on the Huero Buff’s house.

Buzz had not exaggerated about his friend’s condition. Flores had to be assisted off the toilet. His legs were covered in infected intravenous puncture wounds and abscesses. He was at death’s doorstep.

We had just saved the founder of the Mexican Mafia’s life by arresting him and sending him to prison. But he wouldn’t be grateful. He would quickly eliminate anyone he suspected of making the heroin buy for the police that got him arrested until he narrowed it down to Buzz.

Buzz’s days as a snitch had come to an end. Det. Durazo and I conspired and contrived informant fees and witness assistance to obtain as much money as possible—a couple of thousand dollars—to “relocate” Buzz out of the area. He had but one chance and that was to run. He could not return to Hawaiian Gardens. Buzz absconded on parole.

I didn’t hear anything from him again for more than four years. But he called me one day and asked me to meet him. He looked like a different man. And he was a different man.
First he showed me paycheck stubs for every week he had been gone, then he told me this story…

When he left L.A. four years earlier he had bought a used car for a thousand dollars and just drove it north. He ran out of money and gas somewhere near Oxnard. There, he took a job as a fry cook at a little hamburger stand, and he kicked his heroin habit by going “cold turkey” while living in his car.

The hamburger stand was frequented by “roughnecks” who worked on the offshore oil derricks. They told him the money was good and that there were no drugs on the oil rig and all workers were drug tested regularly. The oil company didn’t ask for references and couldn’t give a shit who you were or where you came from, as long as you could work. Buzz conned the foreman into hiring him.

Buzz worked hard for many long hours on the oil derrick, rotating back to the shore every two weeks with the crew. He also gained a solid reputation among the roughnecks and became one of the guys.

One day Buzz overheard two workers talking about how they were going to sue the oil company for millions. They were going to fake an accident on the derrick tower and fall into the sea. The one worker was going to cut open his forehead with a knife to fake an injury from the fall.

Buzz felt loyalty to the company and his boss for giving him a chance when he really needed one. He wanted to tell his boss but then he asked himself: “Who would believe me if my criminal past came out?” So Buzz did what he had become expert at as a police informant, he wore a wire. He bought a small tape recorder and wore it secretly. The two roughneck plotters were recorded on tape explaining their plan to Buzz.

After exposing the fakers Buzz was promoted to foreman. He met a college professor’s daughter while on the mainland and got married. However, he knew that he was a wanted parole violator, and he owed his wife the truth about his drug and criminal past. He sat down and told his wife the whole story. After listening to his tale, she encouraged him to turn himself in and promised to wait for him.

That’s why he came to me and asked me to take him in. I took Buzz to the parole office and showed his parole officer that he had beaten his heroin addiction, was gainfully employed for four years, and had become a productive member of society. He was required to complete another year of parole supervision and then he was released from parole.

Buzzard is gone now, so he need not fear the awful gang monsters that he once called friends. Breaking his gang code had saved his life and paved the way for his return to the straight world. His friend Huero Buff chose to remain bound by the Mexican Mafia’s code of conduct. It cost him his son, his freedom, and finally his life. After serving five years for drug sales, Flores returned home and celebrated by drinking a bottle of tequila. He died of alcohol poisoning.

author: Richard Valdemar | posted @ Thursday, June 26, 2008 5:27 PM

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Re: THE ARYAN BROTHERHOOD & THE MEXICAN MAFIA ALLIANCE

Unread post by OGXCHAOSX216XGANG » May 26th, 2009, 6:45 pm

THE LEADER OF THE MEXICAN MAFIA WAS A CRY BABY A SNITCH AND A HEROIN ADDICT HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!!!! SK 13K ALL DAY

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Re: THE ARYAN BROTHERHOOD & THE MEXICAN MAFIA ALLIANCE

Unread post by OGXCHAOSX216XGANG » May 26th, 2009, 6:56 pm

Huero Buff chose to remain bound by the Mexican Mafia’s code of conduct. It cost him his son, his freedom, and finally his life. After serving five years for drug sales, Flores returned home and celebrated by drinking a bottle of tequila. He died of alcohol poisoning.



TEQUILA TA KILL YA HAHAHAHA FWWCK HUERO BUFF HE GOT KILLED BY A BOTTLE LMMFAO @ SUR TRECE

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Re: THE ARYAN BROTHERHOOD & THE MEXICAN MAFIA ALLIANCE

Unread post by OGXCHAOSX216XGANG » May 26th, 2009, 7:55 pm

Mexican Mafia's roots run deep in San Gabriel Valley
By Fred Ortega, Staff Writer
Posted: 02/10/2008 09:55:57 PM PST

Special Section
Gangs: From Prisons to Back Yards

Frank Girardot's Crime Scene blog

Ralph "Perico" Rocha and Rafael "Cisco" Gonzalez-Munoz committed what is considered a mortal sin among the ranks of the dreaded Mexican Mafia prison gang: they encroached into the drug territory of a senior gang member.

Their transgression marked them for death according to county prosecutors, who in early December charged six individuals with trying to murder Rocha and Gonzalez-Munoz on behalf of another "made" Mexican Mafia member, Jaques "Jocko" Padilla. The six, including Padilla's wife, La Puente resident Maria "Lola" Llantada, are in L.A. County Jail awaiting a March 7 court date.

Despite the arrests, Rocha and Gonzalez-Munoz are likely still in mortal danger; sheriff's officials have confirmed that Rocha was shot last week in the Norwalk area. His injuries were minor, however, and he was treated from a local hospital and released.

Law enforcement investigators and gang associates say the Llantada case, along with a spate of other Mexican Mafia-related cases over the past year, illustrate the influence exerted across vast swaths of the San Gabriel Valley by the prison gang, also known as La Eme. The cases also show that the pilfering of "taxes" on drugs by rival gangs is behind many cases of Eme-related violence, which has plagued the area for decades.

LOCAL ROOTS

Law enforcement experts trace the birth of La Eme - named for the Spanish pronunciation of the letter "M" - to 1957, when a small group of juvenile gangsters
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from East Los Angeles banded together for protection at the Deuel Vocational Institution in Tracy.

Since then, the group has grown to include between 200 and 400 "made" members and is considered the most powerful prison-based gang in California, controlling narcotics distribution inside and outside prison walls and enforcing its edicts on the streets through murders and mayhem carried out by members of affiliated street gangs, which number in the tens of thousands.

"If your gang is from Southern California, you are going to answer to the Eme," said a former Mexican Mafia associate from the Norwalk area who asked not to be identified for fear of retaliation.

And the San Gabriel Valley has long been the Eme's backyard. The first murder attributed to the Eme beyond prison walls occurred in late 1971 in Monterey Park, according to declassified FBI documents, when Mexican Mafia member Alfonso "Pachie" Alvarez was found shot twice in the head in a secluded city park. His offense: collecting taxes on narcotics dealers without kicking up the profits to Eme leaders behind bars, known in the gang as "Big Homies" or Emeros.

As early as 1974, according to the FBI documents, the Eme had carved the San Gabriel
Valley into seven districts for "the organized trafficking of narcotics." The territories were named for the communities they encompassed - Chapman Woods, Arcadia, Temple City, El Monte, Santa Fe Springs and Whittier - and were each assigned to a different Emero, who was in charge of collecting taxes on gangs and drug dealers operating in the area.

"Based on our intelligence they take about one-third" of the profits from criminal activity in their territories, said Guillermo Moreno, a special agent for the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation who specializes in La Eme.

Crossing a powerful figure

Moreno characterized Jocko Padilla, who is serving time in Corcoran State Prison, as one of the most high-ranking Eme members in the San Gabriel Valley.

Padilla was originally an Azusa gangster, but was granted control of the La Puente area based on his relationship with his wife, said L.A. sheriff's Homicide Detective Brian Steinwand, who investigated the Llantada case.

"Llantada was from the La Puente area, so when the families got together, that whole La Puente area became his," said Steinwand.

It is not uncommon for Eme members' wives or girlfriends to control their territories once they become incarcerated, said Moreno.

"It is always someone they trust, and most of the time it is going to be a girlfriend or wife because they start helping them out during their visits, doing stuff for them," he said.

Detectives investigating the 2006 shooting of a Valinda man by alleged gang associates stumbled onto Llantada's proxy control of the La Puente drug territory, and the murder conspiracy against Rocha and Gonzalez-Munoz.

"We heard from informants that (Rocha and Gonzalez-Munoz) were encroaching on La Puente and surrounding neighborhoods," said Steinwand. "We heard rumors that (Padilla) controlled parts of Baldwin Park or El Monte but we have also heard of other Eme members controlling those areas. As far as the actual boundaries (of drug territories), I don't think they even know what they are."

The blurry nature of the rules of criminal enterprise, combined with rivalries between different hierarchies within the Eme and old-fashioned greed, often escalate into internecine rivalry within the Mexican Mafia, as it did in the Llantada case, investigators said.

Federal versus state

Steinwand said Gonzalez-Munoz was from La Puente and was part of a clique of the Puente Trece street gang before he became a full-blown Eme member in federal prison. Trece, Spanish for the number 13, is a moniker used by gangs swearing allegiance to the Eme - M is the 13th letter of the alphabet.

Rocha is the more senior of the two. Like Gonzalez-Munoz, Rocha, originally from the Norwalk area, became an Eme member in the federal penitentiary system, after he was indicted on federal racketeering charges along with high-ranking Eme members like Benjamin "Topo" Peters, Ruben "Nite Owl" Castro, Raymond "Huero Shy" Shyrock and Randy "Cowboy" Therrien.

But the fact that both were "made" in the federal prison system automatically put them in a position of competition - and subservience - with state prison-based Emeros like Padilla, Moreno said.

"The state prison guys were the founders of the original Mexican Mafia, so they have more power in California - and in La Puente," said Moreno. "And you are not supposed to disrespect any family member of an Emero, so she (Llantada) should not have been disrespected since she was working for (Padilla)."

Making a move

But prosecutors say that is exactly what Gonzalez-Munoz and Rocha did upon being released from federal prison in early 2007. Officials with the the's Office would not comment on how much drug tax money the two intercepted, but at least two former gang associates said Perico and Cisco pilfered tens of thousands of dollars from drug dealers in Padilla's territory.

"Norwalk and surrounding barrios are dry right now and the San Gabriel Valley is still a good earner for the Eme so Perico moved in," said the former Eme associate from Norwalk, who said he is related to a deceased Eme member. "A Big Homie like Jocko would control his surrounding area like Puente, Bassett, El Monte, Covina, Bolen Parque (Baldwin Park). So what (angered) Jocko was that Perico was moving in on his turf."

He said drug dealers in the area, and even legitimate businesses including a tow company owner, had been visited by Rocha's associates as recently as two weeks before the Llantada arrests.

"They would say, `The Big Homie Perico has the blessing of' and would name Jocko or another well-known Emero, and these guys out of fear would kick up (the tax)," the associate said.

It is a common tactic employed by Eme members or associates while encroaching on one another's turf, said Steinwand.

"Drug dealers are paying one guy because he is Eme, and then another comes and tells them they have to pay him now," he said.

An official with the the's Office involved in the case likened the tactics used by Mexican Mafia members against one another to a hostile corporate takeover.

"Control of territory, narcotics sales and prostitution are very important to these criminal organizations," said the prosecutor, who declined to be identified for security reasons. "It is analogous to a corporation. If they are vulnerable to being taken over, they can be taken over. It is all about the money."

Marked for death

Rocha and Gonzalez-Munoz apparently miscalculated Padilla's influence. Prosecutors allege that Padilla gave his wife permission to target the two by issuing a "greenlight" - gang parlance for an assassination order - from prison. They believe Padilla used family members to sneak out a "kite," a small paper note with his orders printed in miniature writing on them, in order to ensure the hit.

And despite the disruption of the hit, those orders apparently still stand.

"Word on the street is that Perico is still `off the (reservation),' a target," said the Eme associate.

And that could be why Rocha was shot last week. Sheriff's officials would not release details about the incident, only to say that they received a call Friday night about a shooting involving Rocha. He was uncooperative with detectives when they interviewed him, and he was treated for minor injuries and released the same day.

Steinwand would not speculate on whether the shooting was related to the greenlight issued by Padilla.

"I have no idea," he said. "This guy is involved in so much (criminal activity), it's hard to tell."

Still on the streets

While prosecutors disrupted the alleged murder plans by Llantada and her co-conspirators, Rocha and Gonzalez-Munoz are still free and possibly continuing their criminal activities, in apparent violation of the conditions of their supervised release.

And like the Emero that they allegedly crossed, the two have been convicted of serious crimes. Rocha was rolled up along with other high-ranking Eme members in one of the first federal racketeering indictments of the Mexican Mafia in 1994, accused in court documents of attending Eme business meetings, drug dealing, ordering the stabbing of a rival gangster and conspiring to murder others.

Gonzalez-Munoz was indicted in 2002 of stabbing a fellow federal inmate on behalf of the Aryan Brotherhood, a white prison gang which is allied with the Mexican Mafia.

Both had served their sentences by 2007 and happened to find themselves as the targets, and not the aggressors, in the Llantada case, said one sheriff's official involved in the investigation.

"They were the would-be victims and we did not target them in the investigation," said Lt. Pat Nelson of the sheriff's Homicide Division. He said that information about the case had been passed on to federal officials.

Thom Mrozek, spokesman for the U.S. Attorney's Office in Los Angeles, could not comment on whether officials were investigating the two for possible violations of their conditions of release.

Ongoing influence

The Llantada case is only the latest example of the influence that the Eme wields in the San Gabriel Valley.

In April 2006, four men were arrested in Pomona in connection with an attempted Mexican Mafia contract killing. Their trial is scheduled for this year.

Last November, reputed Emero Frank "Frankie B" Buelna, 61, was shot to death in a Pomona sports bar. Buelna was reputed to have broad power within the Mexican Mafia, and officials are still investigating the motive behind his killing. The perpetrators are still at large.

And in December, reputed Eme member Eulalio "Lalo" Martinez, 46, was charged with ordering the killing of former gang member Donald "Pato" Schubert in Rosemead in 1998. In that case, prosecutors allege that Martinez runs the Lomas Rosemead street gang from Pelican Bay State Prison, where he has been incarcerated for the past 15 years.

La Eme's deep roots in the San Gabriel Valley became clearly evident to Steinwand, the sheriff's homicide investigator, when he moved to the Industry Station from the South Central Los Angeles area early in his career.

"Over there in South Central when there were orders from the Eme to stop drive-bys, guys would go out and do five of them in one night just to spite them," said Steinwand, who has been a detective for 18 years. "But they have a lot more control on this side of the 710 (Freeway).

"When I came to work at the Industry Station, it was amazing," he added. "When the Eme said something, (the gangs) listened."

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Re: THE ARYAN BROTHERHOOD & THE MEXICAN MAFIA ALLIANCE

Unread post by OGXCHAOSX216XGANG » May 26th, 2009, 7:58 pm

MEXICAN MAFIA SUX ON THE ARYAN BROTHERHOODS XXDEEZICKXX LMAO

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Re: THE ARYAN BROTHERHOOD & THE MEXICAN MAFIA ALLIANCE

Unread post by OGXCHAOSX216XGANG » May 26th, 2009, 8:17 pm

Aryan Brotherhood makes home in state
Florence prison now its headquarters

Denver Post/November 24, 2002
By Jim Hughes

When the late New York mobster John Gotti, the "Dapper Don," wanted retribution against a fellow inmate who had attacked him in the federal penitentiary in Marion, Ill., in July 1996, he knew whom to talk to. He went straight to the two inmates running the Marion chapter of the Aryan Brotherhood prison gang and told them he wanted the man killed.

They assigned the job to an Aryan Brotherhood member and told two other men to let the gang's "Federal Commission" know about the pending hit.

They got the message out of Marion, the prison once considered the nation's toughest, and the oral memo moved slowly west until September 1997, when it wiggled into Marion's successor institution - the Administrative Maximum Facility in Florence, the deepest, most heavily guarded, most closely watched hole in the federal Bureau of Prisons system.

Better known as "Supermax," the so-called ADX is the prototype for the nation's super-maximum-security prisons. And it's now the Aryan Brotherhood's home office, with two senior gang leaders incarcerated there, government prosecutors say.

Inmates Barry Byron Mills, 54, and Tyler Davis Bingham, 55, have been able to continue running the gang from inside ADX, a prison designed and managed to isolate the country's worst criminals. A recent federal indictment alleges that over 23 years, 32 murders have been ordered, 16 of them successful, though Gotti's was not.

Mills and Bingham have helped the Aryan Brotherhood develop many criminal enterprises outside of prison walls across the country, last month's 110-page indictment, unsealed in Los Angeles, alleges.

Once released from prison, Aryan Brotherhood members move marijuana by the truckload across the country, according to the indictment. They shake down drug dealers and other profit-makers on the streets, extending the gang's behind-prison-walls practice of "taxing" profit-making criminal enterprises run by other white inmates.

The gang also has entered into partnerships with Asian gangs to import heroin from Thailand, according to the federal indictment.

Motivated by its collective hunger for power and profit, the gang has dropped much of the racial animus present at its founding in the mid-1960s, the government reports. The gang has been partnering with gangs such as the Mexican Mafia for more than 20 years and has nonwhite members.
'Not a racial organization'

"The purpose of the AB is now power and is not a racial organization as it has been deemed in the past," the FBI reported in 1983. "The AB's continue to be aligned with members of the Mexican Mafia and certain motorcycle type inmates."

While officials have known about the Aryan Brotherhood for decades, that the gang is not only present in ADX but being run from there challenges the public perception of the prison as a place where the nation's worst criminals are sent, never to be heard from again.

ADX opened in 1994, and among its current 414 inmates are Unabomber Ted Kaczynski and several of the terrorists convicted of bombing the World Trade Center in 1993.

Officials at ADX restrict inmates' ability to communicate. The hardest cases are locked down, alone, for 22 1/2 hours a day. Ramzi Yousef, the self-professed mastermind of the Trade Center bombing, is one such inmate, according to documents filed by his lawyer in U.S. District Court last week.

The Aryan Brotherhood's ability to function even at ADX, a place bristling with video cameras and microphones, confirms the worst suspicions of penal-system critics, said Kara Gotsch, public policy coordinator for the American Civil Liberties Union's National Prison Project in Washington, D.C.

"Gangs are a huge problem in this country's prison system, and corrections (officials) just have to work harder to make sure that they're not running these facilities," she said. "When you have numerous gangs running the system, we have a major problem."

Gotsch said the rise of gangs such as the Aryan Brotherhood is the ultimate proof that American prisons are failing to rehabilitate their inmates.

As for further restricting prisoners' ability to get criminal messages in and out of prisons, it probably would be unconstitutional to make ADX any tighter, said Assistant U.S. Attorney Gregory Jessner in Los Angeles, who is helping prosecute the Aryan Brotherhood case.

"As a practical matter, unless you cut off all contact with the outside world, people have the ability to send surreptitious messages," he said. "That's essentially impossible to cut off."

According to FBI records, inmates planning crimes often use code words when speaking to visitors and on the telephone.

Some also write letters to people on the outside using "invisible ink." The text of an Aryan Brotherhood communique intercepted in 1984 at the U.S. Penitentiary in Leavenworth, can., was visible only after being pressed with a hot iron, according to the FBI.

It was written in urine, and even that message may have been coded.

Experts also attribute the success of prison gangs to their ability to buy the cooperation of guards. The Aryan Brotherhood indictment alleges that happened at ADX.

Aryan Brotherhood leaders there received key help from former ADX guard Joseph Principe, 42, prosecutors say.

The indictment says Principe filed a false report at the request of Aryan Brotherhood inmates. It also accuses him of arranging for gang leaders to meet, unobserved by other guards, to discuss gang business.

Principe denies both allegations.

He never helped the gang, and it would have been impossible for him to do so, Principe said, adding that the ADX system monitors guards as closely as inmates.

"That's out of the question," Principe said at the state Arkansas Valley Correctional Facility, a medium-security prison, in Crowley, where he is now an inmate, convicted of assault and menacing outside the prison.
Aryan gang arose in 1960s

The Aryan Brotherhood evolved in the mid-1960s from the Blue Bird Gang, a collective of white inmates at San Quentin, a California state prison. By the mid-1960s, after watching black and Hispanic gangs gain prominence across the California state prison system, Blue Bird members decided to change their name and increase their stature, government reports say.

But it was in the federal system that the Aryan Brotherhood found its first significant revenue stream - from Gotti's predecessors in Italian-American organized crime groups, known collectively as La Cosa Nostra.

Often older than other inmates and serving long sentences, those gangland convicts paid for Aryan Brotherhood muscle to keep them alive in some of the country's most dangerous maximum-security prisons.

"In return, the mobsters were safe while inside the walls and were obligated to offer the AB members a 'slice of the pie' on the streets when they were paroled," said a 1983 report from the FBI in Los Angeles.

In 1980, with approval from the Aryan Brotherhood leadership in California, members who had wound up in the federal system formed the Federal Commission to run the gang in federal prisons.

In the early 1990s the Federal Commission formed a middle-management "council," which now runs the gang's day-to-day operations, freeing up Federal Commission members to consider long-term issues, the indictment says.

Inside prisons, the gang has maintained large gambling and extortion operations, and also oversees the buying and selling of "punks," inmate jargon for sex slaves, the indictment states.

The Federal Commission also presided over race wars that pitted the Aryan Brotherhood against African-American prison gangs such as the D.C. Blacks, wars that raged across the federal prison system in the early 1980s and again in the 1990s, government reports say.

A government informant made a suggestion in 1984, after Aryan Brotherhood members murdered prison guards at Marion and at another prison in Oxford, Wis., that may be connected to the presence today of so many top gang leaders at ADX.

"He feels that the murders of the correctional officers will spread like cancer lesions, and the way to stop these murders is to localize the members of the AB and put them all in a single prison," the FBI reported. "This will stop the spread of the cancer."
Studying their operation

Another theory is that prison officials have brought gang leaders to Florence to better study their operation. Officials at ADX for years have gathered information on the Aryan Brotherhood and other prison gangs from prisoner informants housed in a tier of cells called H Unit, Principe said.

ADX inmate John Greschner filed a lawsuit in U.S. District Court in Denver in 2000 alleging that the same H Unit intelligence-gathering operation Principe described was violating his civil rights.

That "snitch" program - which ADX officials would not confirm exists - is probably the source of prosecutors' belief that he was involved with the gang, Principe said.

He said cooperating inmates often make things up to win privileges from investigators, and that is how his name ended up in the indictment.

ADX Warden Robert Hood declined to comment. His executive assistant, Wendy Montgomery, said she couldn't comment on Principe's allegations because they were the subject of an investigation.

She also refused to talk about how prison officials gather intelligence at ADX or how they ensure its validity.

But Dan Dunn of the Bureau of Prisons in Washington, D.C., said investigators are aware of the games inmates play and have ways of verifying intelligence offered by inmate informants.

The Aryan Brotherhood indictment is the result of a six-year investigation led by federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms agents in California.

That investigation saw the participation of every ATF office in the country and of other federal and local law enforcement and corrections departments, said Latese Baker, an ATF agent in Los Angeles.

Though they say they consider the indictment a significant achievement, prosecutors are only tentatively optimistic of what effect the case may have on the Aryan Brotherhood and the larger prison culture.

"If in fact some of them are given the death penalty and that represents a large portion of the leadership, that will certainly change the Aryan Brotherhood," said federal prosecutor Jessner from Los Angeles.Experts say the effect will be little, if any - and short-term, at best.

If the indicted prisoners are somehow taken out of the loop, others will simply assume their leadership roles, experts say.

"It's not going to be broken up," said Robert Walker, a retired South Carolina corrections official and gang expert who now consults prisons on gang management. "The groups are not going to go away."

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Re: THE ARYAN BROTHERHOOD & THE MEXICAN MAFIA ALLIANCE

Unread post by OGXCHAOSX216XGANG » May 27th, 2009, 9:23 am

DAMN Y IZ LA EME XXSUCKINGXX THE ARYAN BROTHERHOODZ XXDEEKXX LIKE THAT? LMAO! STUPID TRAITORZ 2 PEOPLE OF COLOR I MEAN THEM ARYANZ AINT DOING NTN BUT USING LA EME LIKE SLAVEZ CHEAP LABOR RITE? LOL

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Re: THE ARYAN BROTHERHOOD & THE MEXICAN MAFIA ALLIANCE

Unread post by OGXCHAOSX216XGANG » May 27th, 2009, 11:00 am

OGXCHAOSX216XGANG wrote:Huero Buff Flores returned home and celebrated by drinking a bottle of tequila. He died of alcohol poisoning.
LA EME IS WACK!!! LOL

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Re: THE ARYAN BROTHERHOOD & THE MEXICAN MAFIA ALLIANCE

Unread post by OGXCHAOSX216XGANG » May 28th, 2009, 6:36 pm

A YO SURATS STOP SUCKING ON THE NAZIS XXDEEKXX YOU SEWER RAT XXBEECHESXX!

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Re: THE ARYAN BROTHERHOOD & THE MEXICAN MAFIA ALLIANCE

Unread post by OGXCHAOSX216XGANG » May 29th, 2009, 7:08 am

THE MEXICAN MAFIA LOVES WHITE BURRITO! LOL

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Re: THE ARYAN BROTHERHOOD & THE MEXICAN MAFIA ALLIANCE

Unread post by OGXCHAOSX216XGANG » May 29th, 2009, 2:26 pm

F**K THE WOODS AND THE BETHAYS THIS IS BLACK PRIDE GANG ON MINES B***H!

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Re: THE ARYAN BROTHERHOOD & THE MEXICAN MAFIA ALLIANCE

Unread post by OGXCHAOSX216XGANG » May 30th, 2009, 2:10 pm

EAST SIDE WEST SIDE BLACK PRIDE GANG! 2X16ERS! 13=SEWER RATS 18=FAKETEEN 38=DIRTY8 MK=MEXICAN MAFIA KILLER HPS=HERPIES TF=TACO FLATS CV=C00CHYVICIOUS DFS=DUMB F**KS CC13=C00CHYCUTTERS F13=FLOWERS 18=GAYTEEN YEA DATS RIGHT TWO SIXTEEN SAID IT XXBEECHXX!!!!!!!

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Re: THE ARYAN BROTHERHOOD & THE MEXICAN MAFIA ALLIANCE

Unread post by OGXCHAOSX216XGANG » May 30th, 2009, 2:14 pm

OGXCHAOSX216XGANG wrote:EAST SIDE WEST SIDE BLACK PRIDE GANG! 2X16ERS! 13=SEWER RATS 18=eighteen 38=DIRTY8 MK=MEXICAN MAFIA KILLER HPS=HERPIES TF=TACO FLATS CV=C00CHYVICIOUS DFS=DUMB F**KS CC13=C00CHYCUTTERS F13=FLOWERS 18=GAYTEEN YEA DATS RIGHT TWO SIXTEEN SAID IT XXBEECHXX!!!!!!!
I MEAN 18=FAKETEEN AND GAYTEEN LMAO 2SIXTEEN IS WHAT ITS ALL ABOUT!!!!!

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Re: THE ARYAN BROTHERHOOD & THE MEXICAN MAFIA ALLIANCE

Unread post by Myself » May 30th, 2009, 11:18 pm

OGXCHAOSX216XGANG wrote:
OGXCHAOSX216XGANG wrote:Huero Buff Flores returned home and celebrated by drinking a bottle of tequila. He died of alcohol poisoning.
LA EME IS WACK!!! LOL
AHAHAHAHAHAHHAA , LOL

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Re: THE ARYAN BROTHERHOOD & THE MEXICAN MAFIA ALLIANCE

Unread post by MesqFlaco » June 9th, 2009, 12:12 pm

Black Pride.... LOL.

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Re: THE ARYAN BROTHERHOOD & THE MEXICAN MAFIA ALLIANCE

Unread post by perongregory » June 9th, 2009, 6:06 pm

Black Pride... thats what's up

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