Tack Town ES Original Loko Boyz 44

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VictoriousHTZ
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Tack Town ES Original Loko Boyz 44

Unread postby VictoriousHTZ » July 2nd, 2013, 2:07 am

Cambodian Blood gang from LA to Tacoma, Washington. Shares territory with East Side Piru 44. Main enemie are the biggest Crip gang in Washington the Hill Top Crips.

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Re: Tack Town ES Original Loko Boyz 44

Unread postby VictoriousHTZ » July 4th, 2013, 12:06 pm

http://www.streetgangs.com/news/030110_ ... rangup_80s


Gangs sprang up in Tacoma when L.A. groups saw untapped drug market here

By STACEY MULICK (The News Tribune)
March 1, 2010

In the mid-1980s, crack-dealing gangsters in Los Angeles decided to branch out.
Members of two rival gangs – the Crips and the Bloods – traveled to Tacoma in 1987 and found an uncharted – and highly profitable – market on the Hilltop for selling crack cocaine.
With the drug dealing came violence – drive-by shootings, assaults and homicides – as the rivals battled over turf.
Over the years dozens of gangs formed, attracting hundreds of local youths from all ethnic backgrounds. Today, about 50 gangs operate in Tacoma and Pierce County.
Some are small, as few as 20 members.
Some are particularly violent.
In 1998, nine members and associates of the Loc’d Out Crips, at the time a gang comprised mostly of Cambodian, Laotian and Vietnamese people, were responsible for the city’s worst mass homicide – the Trang Dai cafe shooting that left five dead and five wounded.
Some have taken their turn as the main drug provider on the streets.
In 2004, the Seven Deuce Mob rose to the top of cocaine dealers in the city.
A federal drug case brought against the gang ended in 10 members convicted of various crimes.
Over the years, the gangs faced crackdowns by law enforcement agencies that targeted gangs committing the most serious violence or selling the most cocaine. Federal task forces have helped out, going after violent gang members with weapons, drugs and conspiracy charges.
For years, the Original Loco Boyz, a Cambodian gang, “were public enemy No. 1,” Tacoma police detective John Ringer said. That changed after investigators arrested several members of the gang, which in recent months has been “real quiet,” he said.
The Loc’d Out Crips, which was gutted after the arrests in the Trang Dai massacre, also remains quiet.
Traditionally, the gangs formed along racial lines – black, Hispanic, Asian, American Indian and white – and aligned themselves with either the Bloods or the Crips. Others had ties to Mexico and Russia.
Over the years, the gangs became more diverse and intermixed. That’s especially apparent on the East Side, said FBI special agent Todd Bakken, a member of the South Sound Gang Task Force.
“The East Side is so multicultural,” he said. “Gangs on the East Side are more multiracial.”
Some gangs – the Lakewood Hustler Crips, the Eastside Loco Surenos, the Westside Piru and the Tillicum Park Black Gangster Disciples – took their names from the geographic areas they claimed as their own.
Those claims sometimes led to battles, including gunfights, over turf.
The highest-profile fight for control of a neighborhood didn’t involve two gangs but residents fighting a gang. In 1989, a shootout between some Fort Lewis Rangers and gang members led to neighbors starting to reclaim the Hilltop’s streets.
Block watches were formed, drug houses shut down, lighting improved and bushes cut back. Residents learned what to look for and how to report suspicious and gang activity in their neighborhoods to police.
Over time gang violence moved to the East Side, parts of the South End and Lakewood.
The early part of the 2000s saw an influx of Hispanic gangs and violence associated with their members on the East Side. Investigators have said members of those gangs are known to make methamphetamine in large quantities and distribute it.
In recent years, residents on the East Side and the South End have started to fight back, forming block watches, organizing clean-ups, painting over graffiti and talking with police about how to reclaim their streets.

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Re: Tack Town ES Original Loko Boyz 44

Unread postby VictoriousHTZ » July 4th, 2013, 12:12 pm

http://www.time.com/time/magazine/artic ... 10,00.html

From Killing Fields to Mean Streets
By JAMES WILLWERTH Sunday, June 24, 2001
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The middle-aged man had fled Cambodia to save his family from the genocidal Khmer Rouge. Now, as he stalked furiously back and forth across the grimy patio behind a cramped bungalow in the Little Phnom Penh section of Long Beach, he saw a very different threat materializing -- within his own family. His 14-year-old son, gang-named Flipper, and another homeboy, Slicc, 18, were bragging to a stranger about a shoot-out.
"I'm on the corner phone with my girlfriend," Slicc recounted. "The Mexican drives up and yells, 'What set you from?' I yell it ain't none of his business, and he busts three caps ((shoots three bullets)) at me. I take out my gun and bust four back . . ." At that point, the father began to wave his arms and shout. Friends of Slicc's and Flipper's pushed the man firmly back inside his house. "Parents don't understand," shrugged Flipper.

In the bizarre and bloody world of Southern California gang life, armed and alienated children are guerrilla warriors. Cambodian gangs battling Hispanic gangs is but the newest infection. Ira Reiner, district attorney for Los Angeles County (pop. 8,776,000), estimates that 130,000 gang members operate in his jurisdiction alone. They range from subteen "peewees" to as many as 13,000 hard-core killers. Last year in the county the gangs accounted for 18,059 violent felonies and 690 deaths. Nearly every ethnic group is represented in the mayhem: the highly publicized black Bloods and Crips; multigenerational Hispanic groups that account for nearly two-thirds of all California gangs; whites; Asians; Pacific Islanders; and Jewish and Armenian groups.

The kid who traded shots with Slicc was a member of the East Side Longos, a large Mexican-American gang rooted in the Hispanic community that settled along Anaheim Street in Long Beach (pop. 429,000) after World War II. Three decades later, Cambodian immigrants seeking affordable homes arrived. "At school the Mexicans looked down upon us and hurt us," recalls Mad Dog, 29, a "retired" homeboy whose mother was a Phnom Penh university professor. "We saw that American people had groups, white with white, black with black. We decided to become more famous. If they could steal cars and do drive-by shootings, so could we."

In Southern California that was a logical step for the young Cambodians to take. "You land in a gang neighborhood, it might seem natural to form a militia to defend yourself," explains Steve Valdivia, director of Los Angeles County's Community Youth Gang Services Project. Nearly all the state's street gangs started out copying Hispanic "cholo" (lowlife) styles. Scholars trace Hispanic gangs back to the 1920s, when Roman Catholic parishes organized social clubs for children who felt unwelcome at white high school dances. Despite drive-by shootings and drug trafficking, the gangs were tolerated as a "community" issue for half a century. Explains former teen gangster Ysmael Pereira, 48, who is now a gang counselor: "The code was always to keep it quiet."

Harassed by the East Side Longos, the Cambodians organized gangs with names like Tiny Rascals and Asian Boyz. They helped swell Long Beach's gang membership to more than 10,000. Mad Dog and the others imitated their enemies. They "kicked back" on street corners and marked their turf with graffiti. Between turf shoot-outs, they also began to extort "protection" money from local businessmen. Fearing reprisals, the merchants have rarely complained. Gang detective Norman Sorenson remembers contacting dozens of Cambodian merchants after police found a detailed list of extortion victims in the car of a Tiny Rascals leader. "They all denied it," says Sorenson. Cambodian gangsters killed their first East Side Longo in a retaliatory drive-by in October 1989. Gang-related deaths last year: 46.

Many Cambodian gang members became hardened to violence during their escape from the killing fields of Southeast Asia. "I remember walking and walking," recalls Little Devil, 16, describing his family's trek out of Cambodia when he was five. "If we didn't keep up, we'd be lost." Perhaps because of their past globe trotting, Cambodian gang members can be astonishingly mobile. When Long Beach cops saturated the "Anaheim corridor" this summer after a burst of shoot-outs, the Cambodian gangs vanished. "They took off for Stockton and Modesto -- maybe farther," says Mike Nen, an ethnic-Cambodian cop. Adds gang detective Sorenson: "The Hispanics sit on the corner and stare at you. The Asians might fly to Chicago."

Some observers think the East Side Longos would be wise to get airplane tickets too. "The Cambodians know what real war is," says Nen's partner, Patrolman Dan Brooks. "The Hispanics have a street mentality. They shoot on impulse and go home thinking they're safe. But the Cambodians know better." When combat looms, for example, Cambodian gang members sometimes call in reinforcements from hundreds of miles away. Little Devil is an Oriental Lazy Boy from downtown Los Angeles who rode into Long Beach recently with Lazy Boys from Tacoma to help battle the Longos. They left when one of the visiting Lazy Boys was wounded.

"The real issue is family breakdown," says Benton Samana, a Buddhist monk. "Don't believe that snow job about the kids joining gangs to protect themselves." In Southeast Asia, parents take wayward children to monks for counseling. In providing that service here, Samana constantly encounters war- related emotional problems, such as withdrawn or hysterical parents suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder. "Their children think they are wacky," he explains. "They don't want to be around them."

State and local officials have been unable to come up with any comprehensive solution to the gang problem. Meanwhile, demography is making radical changes ; in Southern California's gang life. South Central Los Angeles, where the Bloods and Crips began, now has more immigrant Latino youths than African- American kids. Poor black families have moved out, sometimes to the South, to keep their children out of gangs. "In five years," says educator David Flores, a gang expert who runs special school programs, "the Crips and Bloods will cease to be a serious problem there." Perhaps. But Sergeant Wes McBride, a gang expert with the sheriff's department, predicts that "Hispanic Bloods and Crips" may soon fill the vacuum left by the departing black gang members. On Southern California's mean streets, faces change, but the conditions that breed gangs have not.

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Re: Tack Town ES Original Loko Boyz 44

Unread postby blackitalian » December 19th, 2013, 8:14 pm

I got a homie from the 44. Crazy a$$ dude too

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Re: Tack Town ES Original Loko Boyz 44

Unread postby VictoriousHTZ » January 20th, 2014, 4:14 pm

I know at one point you couldnt talk about WA sets without mentioning OLB. How many hoods they got there now? I heard about this OLB 14 what is that all about?

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Re: Tack Town ES Original Loko Boyz 44

Unread postby VictoriousHTZ » September 21st, 2015, 1:02 pm

Chopped it up with the homie from ES OLB. The homies out there made a few hoods but not the 14s.

And HTC is made by LA Rollin 60s.


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Re: Tack Town ES Original Loko Boyz 44

Unread postby VictoriousHTZ » November 8th, 2017, 1:30 pm

just found this. this site brings discussions on other boards

http://nwgangs.proboards.com/thread/384/lil-bit-history

« General Board
A Lil Bit Of History
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turfj
Jun 4, 2010 at 4:19pm
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http://www.streetgangs.com/news/030110_ ... rangup_80s
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lazyboy
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Jun 4, 2010 at 8:28pm
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nice one homie! the writer was a little off one some of the shit like 1986 there were already L.A. bangers setting up shop here but after 1987 the shit started
to get big and the writer was also a little bit vague on which gangs were dominant and the multi-racial shit was 99% BLOODS especially over here on the E, not like camboz or n8tives
were cRIPz bacK then..........sheeeoot i coulda wrote a more in depth article, hahaha!
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turfj
Jun 6, 2010 at 3:14pm
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^true, there is alot of other sets they left out that go harder than the ones mentioned.
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yeeecuhzz
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Jun 7, 2010 at 11:19pm
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olbz public enemy number 1? lol shit made me laugh
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lazyboy
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Jun 8, 2010 at 9:55am
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yeeecuhzz said:olbz public enemy number 1? lol shit made me laugh


Real shit Dawg they were deep az fucK bacK in the day and also put in hella work az they had somethin' to prove........aye anyboy out there hear the legend of the "cRAB muncher" aka gattling gun they had? Seriously, no joke those MF's acquired a gottdamn gattling gun and had that shit bolted down in a van or trucK, hahaha!! Personally i never saw the damn thing but way too many FOOz i knew did and those niggaz didn't lie. Too bad OLB fell off from what they used to be years ago, Salishan ghetto was no joke bacK then..........
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Jun 8, 2010 at 2:44pm
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was salishan like the projects in tacoma?
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turfj
Jun 8, 2010 at 8:18pm
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^Yes, it was

& what lazyboy is saying is probably true.the asian gangs out here were well connnected.

the hardest asian gangs probably were olb'z & loc'z.

http://www.historylink.org/index.cfm?Di ... le_id=5512

"Down and Up

The year 1991 may have been the nadir in the fortunes of the community. Drug trafficking and drive-by gang shootings marred an already poor reputation for public safety. Community Center Director Michael Bradley recalled, "At that time they were considering boarding it up. There were no kids there. There were older young adults and a lot of pimps and prostitutes. That was their hangout" (News Tribune). That year the Tacoma Housing Authority received a federal grant to reduce crime. The Housing Authority tightened up the screening of new tenants, aggressively enforced eviction policies, and added police and private security.

Crimes dropped from four homicides in 1990 to none in 1996, and from 331 violent crimes in 1990 -- almost one a day -- to 173 in 1996. As crime fell, more people used community programs such as youth groups, Cambodian language school, and African American Drumming."
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Jun 8, 2010 at 8:24pm
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Hahaha, a real gat!!
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Jun 8, 2010 at 9:06pm
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206 said:was salishan like the projects in tacoma?


Yep just like Jayda said......originally was built for military workers during WW2 and up to a few years bacK looked like a fucKen dump and was the ugliest ghetto in Tacoma. That shit was like a maze in there every gottdamn crackerjacK box of a house or duplex looked the same but now it's been revitalized (gentrified)......give it 20 more years and it will look like
the ghetto again.......
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Jun 8, 2010 at 9:17pm
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@turfj said:^Yes, it was

& what lazyboy is saying is probably true.the asian gangs out here were well connnected.

the hardest asian gangs probably were olb'z & loc'z.


For sure the hardest was OLB, deep az fucK too.
A lot of the first ones were from Kali by way of cambodia,
so they already had the G mentality. "Blut....are you cRAB now Blut?" said in my mind with a thicK camBo accent by my old homie Rithisak, haahahahaaa!!!!!! LOL! Sorry that was an inside joke
But imma give props to LOc for the most notorious gang slayings
in the town tho and those knucKleheadz were only a few deep...
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Jun 8, 2010 at 9:22pm
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sanxjonero said:Hahaha, a real gat!!


REAL SHIT just like when the MuthaFucKen Ft. Lewis Rangers
were like "fucK the Hilltop cRIPS, WE'RE the baddest gang in town!" and rolled up to the Hill for a shootout, hahaha, LOL!
Gottdamn, and no one got smoked, WTF!?!?!?!?!!
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theken206
Jun 8, 2010 at 9:47pm
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not uncommon in firefights as it were lazy, if you have an intrest in the subject read Lt. Col. Dave grossmans : On Killing.

and god damn at a gatling gun, thats some seriously funny shit right there hahahaha
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theken206
Jun 10, 2010 at 12:50am
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lazyboy said:
sanxjonero said:Hahaha, a real gat!!


REAL SHIT just like when the MuthaFucKen Ft. Lewis Rangers
were like "fucK the Hilltop cRIPS, WE'RE the baddest gang in town!" and rolled up to the Hill for a shootout, hahaha, LOL!
Gottdamn, and no one got smoked, WTF!?!?!?!?!!


shit didnt someone get murked at ft hood down in texas a few months after all that, it was related to the shoot out.
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Jun 10, 2010 at 11:11am
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@theken206 said:not uncommon in firefights as it were lazy, if you have an intrest in the subject read Lt. Col. Dave grossmans : On Killing.

and god damn at a gatling gun, thats some seriously funny shit right there hahahaha


Yeah but you'd think some bad-ass US trained army Rangers woulda done better......i really don't think they wanted to zap anyone........just get on the news or put the scare into the Hilltoppers.....
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Jun 10, 2010 at 11:13am
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@theken206 said:
lazyboy said:

REAL SHIT just like when the MuthaFucKen Ft. Lewis Rangers
were like "fucK the Hilltop cRIPS, WE'RE the baddest gang in town!" and rolled up to the Hill for a shootout, hahaha, LOL!
Gottdamn, and no one got smoked, WTF!?!?!?!?!!


shit didnt someone get murked at ft hood down in texas a few months after all that, it was related to the shoot out.


REALLY?!?!?! NEVER HEARD THAT, POST SOMETHING IF YOU FIND IT THO!

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Re: Tack Town ES Original Loko Boyz 44

Unread postby VictoriousHTZ » November 8th, 2017, 1:41 pm

history of military cats going at it with hill top crips is interesting

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theken206
Jun 10, 2010 at 2:26pm
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Yeah pretty sure te Rangers were just using suppresive fire and being on the defense, there are some good articles on the shoot out, one dude tried to run up all john wayne style and caught one in the upper chest/shoulder.

The day of the barbecue, Foulk and the neighbors got the gun finger.

It came from bystanders across the street, from cars driving by: the index finger pointed, thumb up, a little flip of the hand, mouthed words: boom, boom.

The gangsters saw the video camera in Foulk’s house. They threw stones and rotten pears at it – one of the scruffy trees on the block was laden with September fruit. Someone else took shots at the house with a BB gun.

Foulk and a few Ranger friends walked across the street to confront the harassers.

It was a short talk, marked by a difference of opinion. Foulk asked for Marco Simmons. The gangsters scoffed.

Foulk told them to stop throwing things at his home and the neighbors, to stop shooting BBs, to knock it off.

The gangsters told him to take the camera out of the window.

“Stop doing wrong,” Foulk replied.

Foulk was 32, already a combat veteran, married, a homeowner. The people facing him were children, barely out of their teens – Simmons was 20.

The gangsters suggested Foulk didn’t know who he was dealing with.

Foulk suggested the gangsters didn’t know who they were dealing with.

The gangsters weren’t impressed.

“You’re history, bitch,” Foulk remembers one of them saying.

They would burn his house down and light him up – after dark, they said.

Foulk walked away, cheap chatter trailing in his wake.

“I’m gonna shoot that Army SOB,” he heard someone say.

Things started moving fast. Harttlet remembers Simmons telling her to take the children out of the house, to go down the block to her mother’s.

“It was out of control,” Harttlet said. “It wasn’t right, you know. But at the time, whether you’re right or wrong – people at that time probably didn’t look at it that way.”


DEFENSE


A few Ranger friends were already at the barbecue. Foulk called a few more. The total grew to 15. He told them to bring personal weapons, whatever they had. He called The News Tribune. A reporter, Dan Voelpel, and a photographer, Russ Carmack, soon arrived.

The plan was defensive, he and his buddies agreed. Stake out locations and wait. No first moves. If police come, disarm immediately. Maybe nothing happens. But if it does, keep the gangsters off. No more.

“Our intent was to not allow them to advance on us,” Foulk said.

Foulk ordered the women into the house. Shirley Luckett, who had a gun, was mildly annoyed. She had sent her children to stay with a relative. However the thing went down, she was in.

“I had a nine (a 9-millimeter pistol) in my hand – yes I did, somebody gave me a nine,” she said. “I was gonna fight for my life.”

A car drove by. Someone in it fired a shot into the air.

After sunset, Foulk turned out the lights in the house and the yard. The neighbors waited



Read more: http://www.thenewstribune.com/2009/09/2 ... z0qUIhO5ao
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turfj
Jun 10, 2010 at 9:36pm
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^it would be cool to see them reenact what happened on that show "shootout" that use to come on the history channel.

i read somewhere those pussy ass army rangers only got off 9 shots during the whole thing.lol their training didn't help them much.they were lucky those gangsters couldn't shoot for shit.
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theken206
Jun 10, 2010 at 9:52pm
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"lol their training didn't help them much.they were lucky those gangsters couldn't shoot for shit. "

naw dawg the hilltop cats where lucky as fuck they were on the defensive and only trying to hold their ground. had the been on the offense the doctrine would to have been fix/suppress the enemy, flank them and engage. Many were experianced combat vetrans, and being rangers they all had good small unit tactics training and experiance. It was dark and most likley just a bunch of suppressing fire at muzzle flashes. the one hit scored in the whole firefight was a hilltop cat that tried to run up and took one in the shoulder/upper chest.

Lets be real, three squads worth of US Army rangers VS a bunch of bangers aint going to work out too well for the bangers if said Rangers wanted to take the fight to them.
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turfj
Jun 10, 2010 at 10:00pm
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^i read they (the army ranger) were hiding behind stuff the whole time, they were too afraid to get more shots off because they were getting lit up, but they were also afraid of hitting innocent people that might be in the area.

& this is coming from their mouth, one of them said this in the article i read.i don't know where to find it now but if i could i would post it.

& how do you know one of them caught one to the chest?

the bangers vs. army guys reminds me of the movie grand torino.
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theken206
Jun 10, 2010 at 10:10pm
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its just part of the lore of the shoot out, cant remember which article I read it in but If i find it ill post it. one of the rangers talked about it, and an unconfirmed report said someone checked into the ER with a shoulder/chest wound.

and shit dude like I said, they were on the defensive and had no intentions of doing anything other than holding down the house. Taking concealment and cover and using suppresive fire was the order of the day as it were. They werent trying to engage and kill a bunch of kats, just protect themselves.

ill try and find that other article right quick....
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theken206
Jun 10, 2010 at 10:16pm
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looks like it was from the same article the I posted the excrept from, shit I think homedude still lives there till this day.

For 20 years, the official version of the shootout held that no one was hurt in the gunfire. Not true, according to Foulk. During the firefight, one gangster rushed toward Foulk’s house.

“I guess he thought he was gonna John Wayne it,” Foulk remembered.

"One of the Rangers took aim and winged the gangster in the shoulder. The attacker staggered back and ran away. The moment goes unmentioned in police reports and witness accounts of the time. Unverified gossip holds that the wounded man was treated at a Seattle-area hospital."

Id love to see all what was caught on video
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turfj
Jun 10, 2010 at 10:19pm
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^why go all the way to a seattle hospital if you live in tacoma?doesn't make sense to me.


anyway, like i said it would be cool if they reenacted this on that show shootout.
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theken206
Jun 10, 2010 at 10:21pm
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from another forum..........

"I remember that.

Foulk was an E7 and Nolte wass an E5 then.
The Rangers involved in the incident were our cooks and support.
Us line guys found out, were pissed that none of us were invited.

In hind sight Foulk did the right thing by not inviting any of us grunts to play.
Things would have really gotten out of control and their would have been a body count that could not have been easily hidden like it was.

If I remember correctly the locals didn't want retaliation from other gangs so those that were shot were kept hush.

If I remember correctly we were locked down from going to assist and were not allowed off post a week due to that. Then if anyone got in any fight off base and found out you would be relieved from the battalion to go sing the Go Go Devil Fight Song. (Leg unit down the street from the Ranger Battalion).

Old memories."

"Your memories are correct. When I got to Camp Murray in 1990 (right across from Lewis), it was still a hot topic."

from the glocktalk.com forum
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lazyboy
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Jun 11, 2010 at 8:38am
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well anyway it was good to bring this up so the kids and outta towners on here knew that this shit went down bacK in the day and that it was REAL shit and not an urban legend.........
good work to both of you kats for digging up that old dirt!
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turfj
Jun 13, 2010 at 2:33pm
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fuck pussy ass bill foulk & his rump rangers. ;)
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theken206
Jun 13, 2010 at 6:33pm
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hahahaha that got an honest lol outta me dude^ Go army nucca HOOO AHHHH
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Aug 4, 2010 at 12:40pm
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Being in the Military . . even Special Forces *don't mean shit* on these streets

I know plenty of people in my lifetime that been to the Military and are dumb, no heart, etc . .

Most them if so damn fraid to break the "Law" to begin with they will cross the street, look the other way, not say shit back . . etc . . They get beat up alot all over the World when off duty w/o their weapons going to bars talking shit etc . . Remember Pioneer Square some years ago didnt some GI Joe get curb stomped to death if I remember right.

Just like anything else there will always be that *Baddass* Ranger, Cop, Gangbanger or your average Joe etc . . . Just wasn't the case this time.

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turfj
Aug 5, 2010 at 4:42pm
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^I agree with that, just because they're a army ranger, marine or cop doesn't mean they're made of steel.
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