Albanian mafia boss Blenar Pajana arrested in Holland

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Albanian mafia boss Blenar Pajana arrested in Holland

Unread postby Dobre » December 21st, 2014, 7:34 am

http://sitel.com.mk/holandija-uapsen-al ... -na-kokain

They consider him to be one of the main organizers of cocaine trafficking in Europe, and he was able to get in 200 kilograms of cocaine a month into the Netherlands, earning him a profit of about 100 million Euros a year.

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Re: Albanian mafia boss Blenar Pajana arrested in Holland

Unread postby DutchGangster69 » December 21st, 2014, 1:45 pm

Never heard of this guy. But tons of cocaine are coming into Belgium and Dutch ports every year and going out the other side.

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Re: Albanian mafia boss Blenar Pajana arrested in Holland

Unread postby Dobre » December 23rd, 2014, 6:34 am

DutchGangster69 wrote:Never heard of this guy. But tons of cocaine are coming into Belgium and Dutch ports every year and going out the other side.


You won't hear about most of them. You only hear about the guys who get taken down, or who are about to be taken down, or have alot of heat on them, or are high profile.

There's the high profile guys that everybody knows, from your average street guy all the way up the chain, kind of like NYC mob bosses or those Bulgarian mob bosses like the Baretta or Mitio the Eyes who are constantly in and out of prison, court or the news.

Then of course there's the low profile guys you don't hear about until they get arrested, and it either goes two ways from there: Their names, along with discussions, interviews and news reports and all sorts of details and rumors, be it on the mainstream media or on the web, come out in a period of several weeks or months after their arrest. Then there's the other type, the ones you have to be more weary about, which only have a news story about them last one day and then they bury it. They bury it, and details as to his trail or the aftermath are only revealed every couple of months or years, and you usually hear it from third party sources, or if it's the mainstream media it's usually an ambiguous report. This is when you know the guy had connections that spread high up on top, and there's bound to be some internal power struggle within the law enforcement or justice system where they don't want it to blow over or leak into the public. Maybe one group of people in the government found out another group of people was collaborating with him, and instead of putting them out for a public lynching, they make a deal together and everybody keeps their positions and they set the guy up.

And then there's the really low profile guys, like the 40,000 Russian gangsters in the US, whose presence you would think would be felt since holy shit 40,000 is a big number, that you never hear about, at all, but have immense amounts of power and wealth - something which movies like the Equalizer try to point out.

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And then, there's the very low profile guys who you NEVER hear anything about, or if you did, it's never the correct story. I can name a few people like this I know personally. They have been operating with immunity for over 30 years, and while everybody in their local vicinity know them to be major drug traffickers, they frequently underestimate their power. This is because they not only have the entire police department, ministry of the interior or military in their pockets, but the police, military and politicians of other countries as well - including the US, Canada and Western Europe, as well as Russia, China, Turkey, India and so fourth. Yes, China and India as well. You have no idea the investments Chinese make that seem like worthless investments where they won't get any return - or have no business being there since there are no Chinese people in that country - but they make the investment nevertheless, and you see a bunch of shady Chinese gangsters standing in the background while the mayor of a local town thanks them for their investment in some small highway and calls them businessmen, and that's all you hear. Not to mention these guys hide behind even Royal dynasties like the British royal family, the Hapsburgs, the Romanovs, any pretty much still existent and powerful historical royal families. They also work hand in hand with intelligence agencies, and if somebody did their research, it could as simple as a slip of mind where you see that the person who is supposedly a mob boss but considers himself a businessman and by others as a small time businessman actually doing delivering something as vague as plastic chairs to a military base run by the Dutch military in Kosovo, for example. Also, powerful Turkish families like the Koc family which runs over 100 companies in all kinds of different industries, do business with these people. The stuff I know, holy shit.

So all in all, there's 3 types of people when it comes to the mafia - the ones that are frequently on the news, the ones that are rarely on the news, and the ones that are never on the news.

200 kilograms of coke a month is miniscule compared to what some people in the Balkans move each month. They move tons. 200 kilos sounds like something a street level guy would move. It takes only a day or two to cross all the borders from Macedonia or Albania or Kosovo into the Netherlands. You can move 200 kilos of coke if you only had a couple of cars. I'm pretty sure one large car can fit 200 kilos in it.

So you have to be moving 20 kilos, at least 10 times a month, in one car, to the Netherlands, to achieve 200 kilos a month.

That's nothing. You only need a crew of about 20-30 people to do that. A few smugglers, a few guys in Macedonia and a few guys in the Netherlands, that's it.

So the fact that they labelled him as "one of the main organizers of cocaine trafficking in Europe" shows that they're either full of shit, or there's something they are not telling us.

Because the main traffickers DO NOT MOVE 200 kilos a month. They move 5-6 tons a month, and in cocaine alone, plus 10-15 tons of heroin and 30-40 tons of marijuana and ecstasy, which I'm pretty sure the Netherlands can produce enough on it's own.

And by main guy - it's not only one guy, you hit him and the whole chain collapses. There's dozens of people like this in the Balkans and they have the Russian mafia's complete backing. And everybody has their own territory.

Don't get me wrong, these whole 10-15 tons of heroin is not solely theirs. It's a joint operation.

If one person did buy, move and resell that amount, YES he would be a main organizer. But that's impossible to accomplish, and yes if you took him down that would be a huge blow to organized crime in Europe.

But that's not the reality. There's no "one guy", even though Interpol would desperately love that to be true.

Take Macedonia for example. There's generally assumed to be 3 bosses controlling all the drugs and prostitutes in Eastern Macedonia. But they collaborate together with the Bulgarian, Albanian, Serbian, Turkish and Russian mafia. Even though Eastern Macedonia is with a population of about 700,000 people, there's still way too many aspects for them to be moving that alone, peacefully, and for a long time at that. So in essence, you have about 20 people, who each run their own businesses, but work together with these 3 people, whom are considered the main guys. 3 people, control 10-15 other local bosses, whom are Euro millionaires or multimillionaires. Some of them run the oil industry, others the cable industry, others radio, others construction, and then others have trucking or expedition companies, and then others are known for owning nightclubs, and then others for cafes and restaurants and boutiques. Out of these people, some have powerful relatives in Bulgaria with the same or different last name, others work with the Onassis family and Lukoil and have powerful relatives in Romania, then others have powerful links in Turkey, while others are intermarried to Albanian mafia bosses, and then others have family links to intelligence officers or directors, or major politicians like the prime minister. But in the end, everybody works together.

Oh and of course, the police helps. Alot of them are related to customs officials or police chiefs, sometimes not directly but through a relative of theirs, which acts as a facilitator to introduce them on a family level.

Of course, if I had a relative who has a relative who is a police chief and I'm a mafia boss, I'd take it more kindly doing business with him than if a friend introduced us, and he was a friend of a friend instead of a relative of a relative. Blood is thicker than water.

So same goes with Bulgaria. It's divided up into regions. You have guys who are on a national level, then you have guys who are on a regional level. The guys who are bosses of Sofia generally control other regions as well, but that may not always be the case. Sometimes Blagoevgrad can run itself, as well as Plovdiv, and then just because a couple people run Varna don't mean they run Burgas, Sunny Beach and Nesebar as well.

You might have bosses that are centered around one town, such as Stip, and then exert their influence over cities like Vinica and Kocani, which would get their smugglers from the surrounding villages. And then a village could have any 30-40 people being involved, with 3-4 people in the village driving nice cars and you know they're the ones who run organized crime out of their village. Then you have Strumica for example, and while it's still under Stip, it runs its own things to the side and of course has an effect over Gevgelija. But then again, it doesn't run Berovo, Delcevo or Makedonska Kamenica - those guys are either under VInica or directly under the Bulgarians, but Stip still has an influence over them. Also, just because Skopje is the capital city, doesn't mean it runs Stip or that the biggest bosses live or operate out of Skopje. For all you know, Stip could actually be under Blagoevgrad, which is under Sofia. And the black sea coast might not be under itself, it might actually be under Plovdiv.

When you go towards Western Macedonia, things become the most complicated in the whole region since it's divided among Albanian and Macedonian groups, with the Russian mafia having a strong influence and pulling strings and the Serbian mafia to a lesser extent. Kumanovo, for example, is divided into 3 spheres of influence when it comes to organized crime: Albanian and Macedonian, and Serbian to a lesser extent.

Of course, Turks still play a role, but usually a minor role on a local level, in every city where there's a sizeable Turkish and Gypsy minority. The Turks act as bosses and organizers, while the Gypsies are the smugglers and footsoldiers and of course, there's always a Gypsy capo or boss here and there.

Veles is under itself, and Sveti Nikole is under Veles. Skopje doesn't have influence over Veles. The Bulgarian mafia doesn't have much of an influence in Western Macedonia either, but a huge influence in Eastern Macedonia, hell, even a presence.

Prilep... I don't know who its under, but I know Krusevo is under Prilep. Same with Ohrid and Struga. Ohrid is divided among Macedonian and Albanian groups 50-50, but Struga is majority Albanian groups. Then again, the biggest Albanian bosses might not run out of Bit Pazar or Cair or Saraj, but out of Arachinovo, Singilic, Tetovo, Gostivar and Kicevo. Hell, even Kumanovo.

Same goes with how Albania is divided up. You have northern, central and southern spheres of influence. The north is run out of Shkoder, the center is run by Tirana, and the south by Gjirokaster. Although, Durres and Vlore are their own separate worlds. Of course, Vlore runs Saranda. There's also a triangle that's run by Korce, exerting influence over northwestern Greece and southwestern Macedonia. Although, what goes on in Ohrid and Struga has more weight than Korce - even for the Albanians. You could say there's bigger Albanian bosses running out of Ohrid and Struga than there is in Korce. And no, Struga isn't completely under Ohrid, even though the two work together side by side.

Serbia - same shit. North, central and southern spheres of influence. You have Vojvodina, which is run by Novi Sad, you have Belgrade exerting huge influence on a national level, but then again Nis for together with the Bulgarians, Albanians and Romanians, but Kosovo plays a larger role over places like Vranje than Nis does. Uzice with Bosnia, and Sabac to a lesser extent.

In Bosnia, it's more similar to Macedonia. In Croatia, it's more similar to Bulgaria. You have those that run the coast on the Adriatic, such as the Makarska riviera, which is under Split. Dubrovnik is by itself. The Makarska Riviera encompasses about 16 different smaller towns excluding Makarska itself. Makarska has alot of rich people, and is an important strategic location for organized crime connected to Italy, Austria and Germany. In Makarska you have maybe 7-8 bosses with 30-40 more bosses under them, similarly divided like Stip, but their presence is felt more of a James Bond type presence than a mafia presence. They know how to keep a low profile. So goes for the rest of Croatia, including Zadar and Zagreb.

Montenegro is a big hub for OC. The Russian mafia MAKES its presence KNOWN there. It's the place in the Balkans that has Russian mafia written all over it and makes its presence known. The second being Bulgaria, especially on the Black Sea. And then, Ohrid and Belgrade to a lesser extent.

There's literally tens of thousands of people active in OC at different levels in Albania, Kosovo, Macedonia, Bulgaria, Bosnia, Serbia, Romania and Montenegro. The overall number is about the same everywhere. but on a per capita basis it ends up being different. Croatia is not even worth mentioning, Romania is also meh. Forget Greece or Slovenia. Turkey is about the same as Romania. But in Bulgaria, Macedonia, Albania and Kosovo, the presence is very felt.


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