the Texas Syndicate

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sneb101
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the Texas Syndicate

Unread post by sneb101 » January 25th, 2004, 9:04 pm

Theres a hispanic gang in texas called the texas syndicate. they have been in the news a whole lot the last couple of weeks because trials involving a bunch of thier members. know anyhting about them?

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E`S`T
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Re: the Texas Syndicate

Unread post by E`S`T » January 25th, 2004, 9:39 pm

Thats not a gang on the calles homeboy. It is a prison gang inside of the Texas Dept. of Corrections. I'm not going to say anymore. Alrato

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Re: the Texas Syndicate

Unread post by sneb101 » January 26th, 2004, 4:34 pm

ya i know they are a prison gang but they are also a streetgang in some texas cities. they have been all over the austin newspaper because 23 i think of thier members were recently arrested off of the streets. they killed some dealer who was claiming texas syndicate and there were a few other murders and other crimes.

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Re: the Texas Syndicate

Unread post by Digital_Designs » February 13th, 2004, 12:51 am

TS originated in the Cali prison system... they dont get along with eme....
They are going at it off and on with ITG (Insane Trece Gangsters) in Central TX.

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Re: the Texas Syndicate

Unread post by stateraised2000 » February 13th, 2004, 12:58 am

heres a lil story i ran across:

"Texas Syndicate"


The Texas Syndicate (TS) formed at San Quentin and Folsom Prison during the early 1970’s. Its nucleus was made up of inmates from Texas who were incarcerated in the California Department of Corrections (CDC). These inmates often came from the EPT or El Paso Tip, but as has been reported in error by some sources they did not call themselves TS until the 1970’s. During this time the Texas Syndicate was a small tight-knit group and they were the most feared on the yard because of their propensity for violence and serious assaults. While formed in California, the TS has not been led by any one inmate in California for many years now. Inmates who join will often have the "Copia" (a Texas Syndicate specific tattoo that is no longer required or it may be camouflaged due to easy ID by officials).

The TS grew rapidly in the Texas Department of Corrections (TDC) after the Estelle vs. Ruiz lawsuit which dismantled the state’s inmate boss trustee system. Between 1980 and 1983, the TS was responsible for homicides and numerous assaults. Between 1984 and 1985, there were 52 gang related killings, many attributed to the Texas Syndicate in their war with the "Mexikanemi" or Texas Mexican Mafia. By the 1990’s, the TS no longer controlled El Paso, Texas which was having problems with a newer independent home-grown gang called "Barrio Aztecas".

Nearly a dozen slayings and attacks occurred on the streets of the Austin, Texas area in the late 1990’s. The crimes were eventually traced back to the Texas Syndicate, which was growing into a major drug supplier in Austin. The TS schemed to collect a 10 percent "tax" from every known drug dealer in town, even those who didn't sell for the prison gang. An FBI led multi-agency investigation was started dubbed "Operation Texas Style". Eventually, prosecutors indicted 22 Texas Syndicate members on a RICO, including some of its leaders. Most, facing overwhelming evidence, pleaded guilty in federal court and were sentenced from 10 years to life in prison.

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mission
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Re: the Texas Syndicate

Unread post by mission » February 24th, 2004, 4:58 pm

This Might Answer some of your TS Questions.


Crime Source: Bloody Prison Gang Hits Dallas
Written by Robert Riggs - CBS 11 TV
Tuesday, 17 February 2004
For the past six months, crime statistics marking Dallas as one of the nation's most violent big cities have politicians searching for explanations - and a new police chief who can fix the problem. Now, a CBS-11 News investigation has uncovered some answers for why Dallas' homicide rate has remained so steadily high the past several years.

A bloody prison gang called the Texas Syndicate has been allowed to take root in Dallas and help spread a crime wave through the city's neighborhoods. This gang doesn't leave graffiti calling cards the way gangs do. They have left a trail of bodies, at least 14 of them in the last year alone in part because Dallas has neglected to join all other major Texas cities in forming a task force to go after prison gangs.

"They're involved in every aspect from murder, sexual assaults, strong armed robberies, thefts...They are just involved in everything," David Landin, an expert on the Texas Syndicate for the prison system's Office of Inspector General.

State investigators say they don't recall Dallas police attending any criminal intelligence briefings on prison gangs during the 1999-2003 administration of Police Chief Terrell Bolton. And, according to several Dallas police sources who requested anonymity, this failure to participate highlights an important crime area that the department has neglected to the detriment of public safety - and to the benefit of an unflinchingly violent Texas Syndicate gang.

From inside the walls of Texas maximum security prisons, this ruthless prison gang runs criminal networks in North Texas that are rapidly expanding, and the deadly arm of the gang has decided to flex its muscle in Dallas. The crime bosses of the gang have declared open season here because, CBS-11 has learned, there's no organized effort to counter them.

Asked what this means for Dallas, Landin said: "It means that your crime rate is going to go up. You find that although the number of them is small, as a group they are committing or involved in most of the crimes."

Landin says the Texas Syndicate moves narcotics and carries out contract murders for Mexican drug cartels, which use Dallas as an international transportation crossroads to distribute their illicit products. CBS-11 has learned that authorities suspect the prison gang is linked to far more than 14 of the city's 223 homicides last year.

Gang members have left behind ugly scenes of death and dismemberment that have largely gone ignored by the Dallas news media - and hence, the city's political and law enforcement establishment.

One such typically bloody slaughter attributed to the Texas Syndicate left three men fatally riddled with bullets - in broad daylight March 27, 2003. Homicide detectives believe the unsolved triple murder was carried out during a robbery of a drug house, possibly orchestrated from inside prison walls somewhere in Texas.

When it comes to killing, the gang does not discriminate in protecting its turf and income. The gang has not hesitated to kill its own when necessary.

Mitchell Lozano, 35, was an ex-con convicted twice for murder and robbery. While doing his time, he became a member of the Texas Syndicate, an enforcer whom authorities believed was involved in multiple killings in Dallas on behalf of the under bosses. On Jan. 21 of this year, his bullet-riddled body was discovered dumped on the side of a farm road near Grand Prairie.

Authorities say he had been executed, shot through the head and neck, to keep him from becoming a potential witness in Syndicate murders. The slaying remains unsolved and went unreported by the local news media.

Since the city's murder rate peaked out at more than 500 during the crack cocaine epidemic in 1992, the rate fell precipitously in the following years due to aggressive law enforcement tactics before slowly climbing again.

Since 1996, the murder rate has averaged more than 200 a year, one of the highest per-capita figures in America. Not until last year, did the crime rate register as a political issue. Dallas Mayor Laura Miller has become personally involved in the police department's handling of the crime problem, attending weekly meetings with police officials.

The overall violent crime rate in Dallas was one factor leading to last summer's dismissal of Chief Terrell Bolton and the launch of an aggressive national search for a replacement. City council members have said they want a replacement who knows how to effectively reduce the crime rate.

Whoever gets the job as Dallas police chief will have a formidable challenge in cracking the growing local hold of the Texas Syndicate.

Inmates say the Texas Syndicate uses sophisticated methods including coded messages to run the gang's drug network out on the streets. Ex-gang members live in protective custody at the Ramsey One Prison south of Houston. A program called "Gang Renunciation" helps them leave their violent organizations.

Ruben Palacios, a former gang member in the program, said the organization exercises a powerful life-or-death hold on individuals.

"To enter, you give them your life," he said. "To get out you owe them your life. So it's blood in, blood out."

These days, most of the Texas Syndicate's 1,300 known members in prison try to hide their signature tattoos, the block T&S, from police. To informed police officers in cities other than Dallas, the tattoo of the Texas Syndicate is a red flag signaling trouble.

Texas Syndicate bosses believe they are untouchable, according to one undercover investigator with the Texas Prison Inspector General's office. And at least in Dallas, they currently are.

Asked if the gang recognizes that nobody in Dallas is watching for them, the undercover officer answered: "Yes. We've had several discussions with members who said, 'hey were were planning to move out in that area."

Ex-gang members like Palacios say the Texas Syndicate does not fear cops on patrol and will not hesitate to kill them.

"It's kind of hard just for a regular police officer to try to go down there and try to take care of business. It wouldn't work," he said.

What has proven to work in other Texas cities is a task force that specifically targets prison gangs.

But Dallas police sources say officers don't know enough here to even draw an organization chart of the Texas Syndicate's most dangerous members.

"I think every officer out on the street needs to know who they are up against when they make that stop," Landin said. "They need to be able to identify these people."

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Re: the Texas Syndicate

Unread post by stateraised2000 » February 24th, 2004, 10:26 pm

damm homeboy. thats a trip. wonder how close that really is? on second thought i DONT wanna know how accurate that is!!! lol...

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Re: the Texas Syndicate

Unread post by civil_thor » February 29th, 2004, 4:26 am

TS sounds like they're no joke...

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Re: the Texas Syndicate

Unread post by Monkeywrench » March 3rd, 2004, 12:43 pm

Mission wrote:This Might Answer some of your TS Questions.


Crime Source: Bloody Prison Gang Hits Dallas
Written by Robert Riggs - CBS 11 TV
Tuesday, 17 February 2004
For the past six months, crime statistics marking Dallas as one of the nation's most violent big cities have politicians searching for explanations - and a new police chief who can fix the problem. Now, a CBS-11 News investigation has uncovered some answers for why Dallas' homicide rate has remained so steadily high the past several years.

A bloody prison gang called the Texas Syndicate has been allowed to take root in Dallas and help spread a crime wave through the city's neighborhoods. This gang doesn't leave graffiti calling cards the way gangs do. They have left a trail of bodies, at least 14 of them in the last year alone in part because Dallas has neglected to join all other major Texas cities in forming a task force to go after prison gangs.

"They're involved in every aspect from murder, sexual assaults, strong armed robberies, thefts...They are just involved in everything," David Landin, an expert on the Texas Syndicate for the prison system's Office of Inspector General.

State investigators say they don't recall Dallas police attending any criminal intelligence briefings on prison gangs during the 1999-2003 administration of Police Chief Terrell Bolton. And, according to several Dallas police sources who requested anonymity, this failure to participate highlights an important crime area that the department has neglected to the detriment of public safety - and to the benefit of an unflinchingly violent Texas Syndicate gang.

From inside the walls of Texas maximum security prisons, this ruthless prison gang runs criminal networks in North Texas that are rapidly expanding, and the deadly arm of the gang has decided to flex its muscle in Dallas. The crime bosses of the gang have declared open season here because, CBS-11 has learned, there's no organized effort to counter them.

Asked what this means for Dallas, Landin said: "It means that your crime rate is going to go up. You find that although the number of them is small, as a group they are committing or involved in most of the crimes."

Landin says the Texas Syndicate moves narcotics and carries out contract murders for Mexican drug cartels, which use Dallas as an international transportation crossroads to distribute their illicit products. CBS-11 has learned that authorities suspect the prison gang is linked to far more than 14 of the city's 223 homicides last year.

Gang members have left behind ugly scenes of death and dismemberment that have largely gone ignored by the Dallas news media - and hence, the city's political and law enforcement establishment.

One such typically bloody slaughter attributed to the Texas Syndicate left three men fatally riddled with bullets - in broad daylight March 27, 2003. Homicide detectives believe the unsolved triple murder was carried out during a robbery of a drug house, possibly orchestrated from inside prison walls somewhere in Texas.

When it comes to killing, the gang does not discriminate in protecting its turf and income. The gang has not hesitated to kill its own when necessary.

Mitchell Lozano, 35, was an ex-con convicted twice for murder and robbery. While doing his time, he became a member of the Texas Syndicate, an enforcer whom authorities believed was involved in multiple killings in Dallas on behalf of the under bosses. On Jan. 21 of this year, his bullet-riddled body was discovered dumped on the side of a farm road near Grand Prairie.

Authorities say he had been executed, shot through the head and neck, to keep him from becoming a potential witness in Syndicate murders. The slaying remains unsolved and went unreported by the local news media.

Since the city's murder rate peaked out at more than 500 during the crack cocaine epidemic in 1992, the rate fell precipitously in the following years due to aggressive law enforcement tactics before slowly climbing again.

Since 1996, the murder rate has averaged more than 200 a year, one of the highest per-capita figures in America. Not until last year, did the crime rate register as a political issue. Dallas Mayor Laura Miller has become personally involved in the police department's handling of the crime problem, attending weekly meetings with police officials.

The overall violent crime rate in Dallas was one factor leading to last summer's dismissal of Chief Terrell Bolton and the launch of an aggressive national search for a replacement. City council members have said they want a replacement who knows how to effectively reduce the crime rate.

Whoever gets the job as Dallas police chief will have a formidable challenge in cracking the growing local hold of the Texas Syndicate.

Inmates say the Texas Syndicate uses sophisticated methods including coded messages to run the gang's drug network out on the streets. Ex-gang members live in protective custody at the Ramsey One Prison south of Houston. A program called "Gang Renunciation" helps them leave their violent organizations.

Ruben Palacios, a former gang member in the program, said the organization exercises a powerful life-or-death hold on individuals.

"To enter, you give them your life," he said. "To get out you owe them your life. So it's blood in, blood out."

These days, most of the Texas Syndicate's 1,300 known members in prison try to hide their signature tattoos, the block T&S, from police. To informed police officers in cities other than Dallas, the tattoo of the Texas Syndicate is a red flag signaling trouble.

Texas Syndicate bosses believe they are untouchable, according to one undercover investigator with the Texas Prison Inspector General's office. And at least in Dallas, they currently are.

Asked if the gang recognizes that nobody in Dallas is watching for them, the undercover officer answered: "Yes. We've had several discussions with members who said, 'hey were were planning to move out in that area."

Ex-gang members like Palacios say the Texas Syndicate does not fear cops on patrol and will not hesitate to kill them.

"It's kind of hard just for a regular police officer to try to go down there and try to take care of business. It wouldn't work," he said.

What has proven to work in other Texas cities is a task force that specifically targets prison gangs.

But Dallas police sources say officers don't know enough here to even draw an organization chart of the Texas Syndicate's most dangerous members.

"I think every officer out on the street needs to know who they are up against when they make that stop," Landin said. "They need to be able to identify these people."
Its open season here.

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Unread post by willihen » September 21st, 2007, 8:29 am

Based centrally out of Austin. La Capirucha.

You are correct when you say "They are no joke"

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Unread post by MMRbkaRudog » September 21st, 2007, 11:47 am

Is this the gang that uses a cardinal as a symbol? I met someone who had a tattoo of a bato with a cardinal head & it looked exactly like a tat I had seen online. He was older & I think he said he wasn't into gangs any more, but I didn't want to ask about the tat. I know some q's you just don't ask, especially since I think it was a prison gang tat.

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Unread post by MesqFlaco » September 25th, 2007, 10:25 am

The Texas Syndicate uses variations of the Texas Rangers like "T" with a "S" shape of some form around it. Most common I've seen are a snake shaped S around the block letter T. They get more detailed and unoticeable but from I understand now - most Texas Prison gangs are not tattoing themselves at all - to hide in the system un-noticed and un-documented. Smart.


I'd like to know more about the "Tango/Tanko Blast" that forms out of Texas cities such as Dallas and Houston.


When I was in Lew Sterrett for a few days on some ticket BS, I met a guy from San Antonio that was sweating my Dallas Tattoo on my leg. He said that Dallas and Houston have a rivalry with "San An-tone" and that he was afraid I was "going to put him on blast" which is a slang term for the TK members? \

I shouldn't say he was "afraid" he was more like "let's get it over with now" then for me to wait until he wasn't looking or something.

First I heard of Tango blast and been curious ever since.

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Unread post by chupon106 » March 21st, 2008, 10:40 pm

I think the Texas Syndicate is hardest gang bangin in Texas. Where I'm from, down in the RGV we usually call em Cuernos. They murder fools left and right out there. I have personally met some of their victims. I personally knew this 1 vato who not too long ago got shot in the face by some TS and lost 1 of his eyes. In some regions they have major beef with the Vallucos, especially Cameron County jail. I here they got a heavy presence out here in the ATX as well. TS put it down for real.

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