Mad San Destefano-pyscho Killer

American organized crime groups included traditional groups such as La Cosa Nostra & the Italian Mafia to modern groups such as Black Mafia Family. Discuss the most organized criminal groups in the United States including gangs in Canada.
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mayugastank
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Mad San Destefano-pyscho Killer

Unread post by mayugastank » April 24th, 2010, 2:07 am

Chicago Police Department mugshot of Mad Sam DeStefano
Born September 13, 1909(1909-09-13)
Southern Illinois, U.S.
Died April 14, 1973 (aged 63)
Chicago, Illinois, U.S.

Sam "Mad Sam" DeStefano (September 13, 1909 — April 14, 1973) was an American gangster who became one of the Chicago Outfit's most notorious loan sharks and sociopathic killers. Chicago-based Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) agents such as William F. Roemer, Jr., considered DeStefano to be the worst torture-murderer in the history of the United States.[1] The Outfit used the mentally unstable and sadistic DeStefano for the torture-murders of Leo Foreman and Arthur Adler, the murder of DeStefano's younger brother, Michael DeStefano, and Outfit enforcer and fellow loan shark William "Action" Jackson and many others. However, due to DeStefano's deranged mental state, The Outfit never let him become a Made man. At least one Outfit insider, Charles Crimaldi, claimed DeStefano was a Devil worshipper.[2] He also became the uncle of Outfit mobsters Rocco DeStefano and Samuel DeStefano, who was named after, "Mad Sam."[citation needed]



[edit] Early years
DeStefano was born in Streator, Illinois, into a typical law-abiding Italian-American family of Samuel DeStefano, Sr., and Rosalie DeStefano (née Brasco). DeStefano, Jr's., parents were both born in Italy and had immigrated to the United States in 1903. DeStefano moved to Chicago's Little Italy as a teenager, with his family. Destefano, Sr., was a laborer and, later on in life, went on to be a store grocer and a real estate salesman before dying of natural causes, in 1942, at age 77. DeStefano, Jr's., mother, Rose, was a housewife, who throughout her life was supported by the contributions of her children. She died in October 1960. In all, the DeStefanos had six children, four sons and two daughters.

Sam DeStefano, Jr., suffered from malignant narcissism.[citation needed] In 1927, at age 18, DeStefano was convicted of rape and sentenced to three years imprisonment.

Released in 1930, DeStefano joined the Forty-Two Gang, an infamous Chicago street gang led by future Outfit boss, Salvatore Giancana. DeStefano soon became involved in bootlegging and gambling. In 1932, he was wounded during a grocery store robbery. In 1934, Stefano was convicted of a bank robbery in New Lisbon, Wisconsin and sentenced to 11 years in prison. Released in 1944, he returned to prison in 1947 for selling counterfeit sugar ration stamps.

While in Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary, in the 1940s, DeStefano met Outfit members Paul Ricca and Louis Campagna. Later in 1947, DeStefano was released and obtained a civil service job in Chicago as a garbage dump foreman. In 1952, city officials discovered DeStefano had omitted his criminal record from the Civil Service application; however, they chose not to prosecute him.

[edit] Political fixer
During the early 1950s, DeStefano became one of the first loan shark operators in Chicago with his brother Mario Anthony DeStefano, a "made" Outfit member. Using stolen money from his days as a bank robber, Sam DeStefano began investing in Chicago real estate. He bought a 24-suite apartment building and used the rent money as legitimate income to bribe local aldermen and other politicians.

By the mid-1950s, DeStefano's influence extended to city officials, prominent judges, and law enforcement officers. DeStefano would brag "there wasn't any case he couldn't 'fix,'" and began offering his services accordingly. His fees ranged from $800 for fixing a robbery case to $1,500 for an assault case. DeStefano allegedly fixed a first-degree murder case for $20,000. DeStefano's arrangements became so routine, corrupt police officers would escort suspects to DeStefano's house. After DeStefano paid off the cops, the suspects would be "put on the juice" to DeStefano in exchange for his assistance.

[edit] Loan shark
By the early 1960s, DeStefano, along with his brother, Mario, was a leading loan shark for The Outfit.[citation needed] DeStefano's loan shark victims included politicians, lawyers and small-time criminals; by the end of the decade, DeStefano was charging 20% to 25% a week in interest. DeStefano would accept very high-risk debtors, such as drug addicts or business men who had already defaulted on previous debts. The reason was simple: DeStefano enjoyed it when debtors didn't pay on time. He could then bring them to the sound-proof torture chamber he built in his basement. Other gangsters said the sadistic DeStefano would actually foam at the mouth while torturing his victims. From time-to-time, DeStefano would also kill debtors who owed him small sums just to scare other debtors into paying their bigger debts.

Under normal circumstances, the Outfit would have distanced itself from DeStefano due to his sadistic behavior. However, the bosses tolerated DeStefano because he earned them a great deal of money. DeStefano was such a successful earner, Giancana and Tony Accardo invested some of their own money in DeStefano's loansharking operations.

[edit] Bloody trail
In 1955, underboss Giancana allegedly ordered DeStefano and his brother Mario to murder their younger brother Michael DeStefano, a mob wannabe and drug addict. On September 27, Michael's body was found in a car trunk in a West Side neighborhood; he had been shot to death. When police questioned DeStefano about the murder, he allegedly began laughing uncontrollably. The police later released DeStefano due to his political influence and a lack of evidence. Neither he or Mario were charged in Michael's murder.[citation needed]

In 1961, the Outfit mistakenly suspected enforcer and loanshark William "Action" Jackson had become an FBI informant, after he'd met with the FBI in Milwaukee and someone spotted Jackson there. Jackson was then grabbed off the street and taken to a meat-rending plant on Chicago's south side, where DeStefano and others brutalized Jackson with a cattle prod, while he was suspended on and tied onto to a hook, where he died within three days after lapsing into unconsciousness. Jackson had never become an informant.[3]

In November 1963, DeStefano had a violent argument with Leo Foreman, a real estate agent and one of DeStefano's "juice-loan" collectors,[4] in Foreman's office. DeStefano was physically ejected by Foreman from his office and then went into hiding. Later on, DeStefano underlings Tony Spilotro and Chuck Crimaldi contacted Foreman and said DeStefano wanted to let, "bygones be bygones." Believing them, Foreman accepted an invitation to Mario DeStefano's house, in Cicero. Foreman arrived at the house and was given coffee and "small talk" by Mario DeStefano and Spilotro. After that had run its course, Foreman was lured into DeStefano's basement with talk that he'd turned it into a bomb shelter. The basement was only sound-proofed. When Foreman got into the basement, DeStefano and Spilotro worked-over Foreman mercilessly, for some time, until Sam Destefano arrived with an ice pick and a gun. He finished-off Foreman.[5]

In another incident, Peter Cappelletti, a collector for DeStefano, fled Chicago with $25,000 from a loan shark victim. DeStefano's men located Cappelletti in Wisconsin and brought him back to Chicago. DeStefano chained Cappelletti to a radiator and tortured him for three days. On the last day, DeStefano invited Cappelletti's family to Mario's restaurant for a banquet. While the banquet was going on, Cappelletti was secretly being tortured again in the back of the restaurant. Finally, the DeStefano's men dragged the severely burned Cappelletti into the dining area. DeStefano then forced the man's family to urinate on Cappelletti in unison. Following the banquet, the family quickly paid back the stolen money.[citation needed]

[edit] Everyone at risk
With DeStefano around nobody was safe. At one point, as he was riding around in his car, he saw a black man walking down a Chicago street. DeStefano forced the man into his car at gun point, took the man to his house and forced the man and his own wife to have sex with each other, all for some real or imagined grievance DeStefano had with his wife. Afterward, the black man was so mortified and scared he was going to be accused of rape, he bolted to the nearest police station and reported the incident.[6]

[edit] Final justice
In 1965, DeStefano was convicted of conspiracy and sentenced to three to five years in prison. On February 22, 1972, DeStefano was sentenced to three-and-one-half years in prison for threatening the life of a witness. The witness was mobster turned informant Crimaldi, an accomplice in the Foreman murder. DeStefano had encountered Crimaldi in the elevator of the Chicago Dirksen Federal Building and threatened him.

DeStefano and his associates were eventually indicted for the Foreman murder. As in his previous trials, DeStefano had raised a large amount of public interest with his bizarre behavior. He made demands to represent himself, dressed in pajamas, shouted through bullhorns, and rambled incoherently. DeStefano then started displaying similar behavior in the Foreman trial. The Outfit bosses began to worry DeStefano was not only jeopardizing his own defense, but also the defenses of his other crew members. In a secret meeting, the bosses gave DeStefano's crew permission to kill him.

On Friday,[7] April 14, 1973, DeStefano was to meet with his crew in the garage of his West Side, Austin neighborhood home, in the 1600 block of North Sayre Avenue. Before the meeting began, Spilotro allegedly entered the lot and shot DeStefano twice with a shotgun, hitting him in the chest and tearing his right arm off at the elbow, instantly killing him.[8][9][10] Although Mario DeStefano and Spilotro were suspects in Sam DeStefano's murder, no one was ever charged.

Mario DeStefano was eventually convicted of complicity in the Foreman murder and received 20-to-40 years in prison, but was released in 1975. He died a month later while his sentence was on appeal. Spilotro was acquitted of murdering Foreman.

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Re: Mad San Destefano-pyscho Killer

Unread post by mayugastank » April 24th, 2010, 2:09 am

What a maniac as bad as Roy Demeo

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Re: Mad San Destefano-pyscho Killer

Unread post by thewestside » April 26th, 2010, 10:20 pm

mayugastank wrote:What a maniac as bad as Roy Demeo
He was definitely a psychopath, as contrasting most mafiosi who are merely sociopaths. I don't think he was involved in as many murders as DeMeo was though.

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Re: Mad San Destefano-pyscho Killer

Unread post by mayugastank » April 26th, 2010, 11:59 pm

Who is the biggest mafia killer ? any articles?

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Re: Mad San Destefano-pyscho Killer

Unread post by thewestside » April 27th, 2010, 11:39 am

mayugastank wrote:Who is the biggest mafia killer ? any articles?
That is something that will never be known for sure. Albert Anastasia was said to have been responsible, either directly or by order, for over 50 murders. The DeMeo crew alone was responsible for at least 56 murders. Some have said as high as 200. Former Lucchese Underboss Anthony Casso was involved in 36 murders. Former Gambino Underboss Sammy Gravano was involved in 19 murders.

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Re: Mad San Destefano-pyscho Killer

Unread post by MCD » May 9th, 2010, 10:28 pm

some sadistic fools right here, u definitely gotta have some screws loose to do that shit, reminds me of those serial killers in the desert that built that torture chamber.

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Re: Mad San Destefano-pyscho Killer

Unread post by mayugastank » May 10th, 2010, 4:55 pm

this guy was crazy ass hell........................TOMMY KARATE






Biography
[edit] Early years
Born in New York City, Pitera grew up in the Sheepshead Bay section of Brooklyn. During the 1980s Pitera became a "made man" of the Bonanno family. Pitera was highly skilled in martial arts, having spent 27 months training assiduously in Japan and only after winning an arduous kumite competition for that privilege. This led him to acquire the nickname "Tommy Karate". Pitera quickly earned a reputation for violence. Pitera was one of the most feared soldiers on the streets, amongst the likes of Anthony "Tony" Mirra and Roy DeMeo, who were two other brutal underworld killers.

Pitera belonged to a family faction headed by Captains Alphonse Indelicato, Dominick Trinchera and Philip Giaccone. This group opposed the current leadership Underboss Philip Rastelli and his leading Captains Joseph Massino and Dominick Napolitano. In 1981, Massino and Napolitano set up the murders of the three rival Captains in a Brooklyn club. After their deaths, Massino quickly made peace with the rest of the leaderless faction, including Pitera.

[edit] Criminal career
On August 29, 1988, Pitera ambushed Wilfred "Willie Boy" Johnson as he walked ahead to their car and shot him to death. Johnson had been a close associate of Gambino crime family boss John Gotti since the two of them had been petty burglars and thieves. Johnson had also had served as a driver to Gotti after Gotti became a made man and Captain with the Gambinos. In 1985, Gotti discovered that Johnson had been a government informant since 1966. Pitera murdered Johnson as a favor to Gotti. The hit had been delegated to Pitera and fellow gunman, Vincent "Kojak" Giattino, by Gambino Capo Eddie Lino.

Pitera was close to Bonanno Consigliere Anthony Spero, who headed the violent Bath Beach crew. This group was involved in extortion, loan sharking, drug dealing and murders. Pitera's crew was notorious for robbing drug dealers and then reselling their drugs. Pitera murdered two Colombian drug kingpins and then resold their 40 pounds of cocaine.

Pitera killed Tala Siksik, an Arab drug supplier, in his Brooklyn apartment. Pitera then stripped him naked, skillfully sliced Siksik's body into six pieces in the bathtub and then buried it at his own secret dumping ground. Six of Pitera's victims turned up at a Mafia graveyard in the borough of Staten Island near the William T. Davis Bird Sanctuary. Pitera chopped off the victims' heads and buried them separately to avoid identification through dental records.

This area was a favorite of Pitera's for body disposal because he believed that the damp soil would accelerate decomposition. He always insisted that the corpses be buried deep enough so that police dogs could not sniff them out. One additional measure which possibly proved even more effective, and which apparently was never anticipated by law enforcement, was wrapping the body parts in plastic and/or placing them in cheap suitcases.

Pitera's approach to murder and body disposal was cold-hearted and clinical. He studied books on dissection and carried a special tool kit for this purpose. Pitera's one weakness was for keeping ultimately incriminating souvenirs of his work, which consisted mostly of jewelry. This went beyond Mafia culture and was classic serial killer behavior.

On June 4, 1990, Pitera was indicted for heading a drug dealing crew and for his involvement in seven murders, including that of Wilfred Johnson. Investigators alleged that Pitera had been involved in as many as 60 murders. Pitera's crew sold about 220 pounds of cocaine per year, multiple kilos of heroin and hundreds of pounds of marijuana. FBI agents discovered more than 60 automatic weapons, knives, swords, and literature such as The Hitman's Handbook and Kill or Be Killed, which dealt primarily with assassination techniques as well as torturing and dismembering cadavers, in Pitera's apartment in Gravesend, Brooklyn.

[edit] Trial
One of Pitera's crew members, Frank Gangi, the nephew of Genovese crime family Captain Rosario Gangi, decided to testify against Pitera after being arrested for driving under the influence and then reliving Pitera's worst atrocities in his mind while sitting in the holding cell. He confessed to all the murders he was involved in with Pitera or had knowledge of. Gangi described how Pitera matter-of-factly assassinated Gangi's girlfriend Pyhllis Burdi while she was passed out in bed in the aftermath of a cocaine-fueled sex marathon with Gangi. Pitera then took Burdi's corpse into the bathroom and he then cut her body into the usual 6 pieces. Gangi also testified that during a fight with a drug dealer named Marek Kucharsky, Pitera pulled a knife and repeatedly stabbed Kucharsky and cut his throat.

In Pitera's trial, the chief prosecutor, David W. Shapiro, demanded the death sentence for the "heinous, cruel and depraved" murders committed by Pitera. He called Pitera a "heartless and ruthless killer" explaining in detail how Pitera tortured one victim by slowly, deliberately shooting him seven times in various parts of the body, in one of a series of murders carried out in a deliberately barbaric manner. The prosecution also produced one more witness, a DEA agent who testified to digging up graves containing the dismembered bodies of a few victims.

Pitera's defense lawyer, David A. Ruhnke, urged the jury to reject the death penalty on the grounds that Pitera had no prior criminal record and that other participants in the murders were allowed to plead guilty to lesser charges. Moreover, only two of the murder victims, Richard Leone and Solomon Stern, were killed on March 15, 1989, after the Federal death penalty law went into effect. The four other murders took place earlier, so those counts carried maximum sentences of life in prison. Pitera's aunt, sister-in-law and two cousins testified on Pitera's defense that he was a loving and caring family member.[1]

[edit] Life sentence
On June 25, 1992, Pitera was convicted of murdering six people and supervising a massive drug dealing operation in Brooklyn. Alluding to evidence that he brutally killed his victims and dismembered their bodies, Judge Reena Raggi sentenced him, saying, "Mr. Pitera, nobody deserves to die as these people died." [2] After the verdict was read, Pitera smiled and gave a thumbs up to reporters sitting in the Brooklyn courtroom. Pitera would avoid the death penalty and be sentenced to life in prison. Pitera was irritated by the fact that Frank Gangi was looking for a reduction of the 10 years he got from the same federal judge who sentenced Pitera to life.

"Gangi said he was sorry about killing five people and that he became an informer because he wanted to start a new life. He gets 10 years, a good deal, and he goes whimpering and weeping to the judge looking for a break. If you're really sorry for killing five people, you take your punishment like a man." In the same year, Raggi again refused a motion to reduce Gangi's sentence.[3]

Pitera is currently serving a life sentence at the United States Penitentiary, for high risk inmates, at the Federal Correctional Institute, Allenwood in Pennsylvania (Inmate ID: 29465-053). Author Philip Carlo released a book detailing the four year investigation by the DEA to bring down Tommy Karate and his entire crew; entitled The Butcher: Anatomy Of A Mafia Psychopath.

[edit] References

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Re: Mad San Destefano-pyscho Killer

Unread post by MCD » May 10th, 2010, 9:39 pm

the mob is the perfect place for serial killers, might as well make some money white you're having fun murdering.

what about that hitman Kuklinski? wasn't he accused of killing Demeo? he was featured on that show "Most Evil" one time.

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Re: Mad San Destefano-pyscho Killer

Unread post by thewestside » May 10th, 2010, 9:42 pm

Another mafioso that had a reputation for being a vicious son of a bitch was Carmine Galante.

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Re: Mad San Destefano-pyscho Killer

Unread post by thewestside » May 10th, 2010, 9:45 pm

MCD wrote:what about that hitman Kuklinski? wasn't he accused of killing Demeo? he was featured on that show "Most Evil" one time.
Kuklinski was mostly full of shit. He claimed to be involved in the Jimmy Hoffa, Carmine Galante, and Paul Castellano murders. That tells you all you need to know about him. He didn't have anything to do with the DeMeo hit either.

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Re: Mad San Destefano-pyscho Killer

Unread post by NateDogg » June 16th, 2010, 4:15 pm

I had never heard of this guy before but he seems to have been an extremely dangerous mob guy in Sicily nicknamed The Cobra for his favorite gun the Colt Cobra and when he was assassinated 4 veteran hitmen all with at least 10 hits under their belt were sent to kill him he still managed to kill one and wound another before being machine gunned to death.


Michele Cavataio (Palermo, 1929 - Palermo, December 10, 1969), also known as The Cobra was a powerful member of the Sicilian Mafia. He was the boss of the Acquasanta mandamento in Palermo and was a member of the first Sicilian Mafia Commission. Some sources spell his surname as Cavatajo.
Cavataio was one of the most feared mafioso gangsters of his time. His nickname The Cobra allegedly came from his favorite firearm, the Colt Cobra, a six-shot revolver.[1] He was described as a cunning killer with a face like a gorilla.[2]

[edit]Early Mafia career
Cavataio was seen as an exponent of a 'new' Mafia of Americanized gangsters that appeared in the mid 1950s. After World War II, he made his fortune selling petrol that was stolen from the Italian Navy. From the modest position of a taxi driver, he accumulated a considerable fortune in a few years, according to a report of the Parliamentary Antimafia Commission.[3] The Acquasanta Mafia family controlled the docks of Palermo that were situated in their area. They acted as strike breakers against the dockworkers, and did not hesitate to shoot at the strikers if necessary.[4]
In 1955, the bosses of the Acquasanta Mafia clan, Gaetano Galatolo and Nicola D’Alessandro were killed in a dispute over the protection rackets when the fruit and vegetable wholesale market moved from the Zisa area to Acquasanta, disturbing the delicate power balances within Cosa Nostra. The killer of Galatolo was never identified, but Cavataio was suspected. Cavataio became the new boss of the clan and had to agree to split the profits of the wholesale market racket with the Greco Mafia clan of Ciaculli, who traditionally controlled fruit and vegetable supply to Palermo wholesale market.
Cavataio actively participated in what is called the 'Sack of Palermo' during the reign of Salvo Lima as mayor of Palermo. Mafia bosses were granted building licenses through contacts with politicians. The construction boom destroyed the city's green belt and villas that gave it architectural grace, to make way for characterless and shoddily constructed apartment blocks.
[edit]First Mafia War
Cavataio was one of the protagonists of the first Mafia War in 1962-63. According to the pentito Tommaso Buscetta it was Michele Cavataio who deliberately escalated a dispute between different factions. The conflict erupted over an underweight shipment of heroin. The shipment was financed by Cesare Manzella, the Greco cousins from Ciaculli and the La Barbera brothers. Suspicion fell on Calcedonio Di Pisa, who had collected the heroin and had organised the transport to New York.[5]
The case was brought before the Mafia Commission, but disagreement on how to handle it led to a bloody conflict between clans allied with the Grecos, headed by Salvatore Ciaschiteddu Greco, and clans allied with the La Barberas – in particular when Di Pisa was killed on December 26, 1962. The Grecos suspected the La Barberas of the attack.
However, it had been Cavataio who had killed Di Pisa in the knowledge that the Grecos would blame the La Barberas and a war would be the result. Cavataio – having his own problems with Di Pisa and wanting him out of the way, and on bad terms with the La Barberas as well – contrived Di Pisa’s murder in such a way that the La Barberas would appear responsible. He kept fuelling the conflict with more bomb attacks and killings. Other Mafia families who resented the growing power of the Sicilian Mafia Commission to the detriment of individual Mafia families backed Cavataio.[6] Behind both Cavataio and La Barbera was an alliance of bosses from the north-west of Palermo who resented the Commission’s growing power, and the influence of the south-eastern Palermo cosche such as the Grecos.[7]
Cavataio then participated, along with Pietro Torretta, Buscetta and another Acquasanta capo, in several car bomb attacks on the Grecos and their allies, considered enemies because of their intrusion in the wholesale produce market.[8] He was responsible for a car bomb that exploded near Greco’s house in Ciaculli on June 30, 1963, killing seven police and military officers sent to defuse it after an anonymous phone call. The outrage over the Ciaculli massacre changed the Mafia war into a war against the Mafia. It prompted the first concerted anti-Mafia efforts by the state in post-war Italy. The Sicilian Mafia Commission was dissolved and of those mafiosi who had escaped arrest many went abroad. Cavataio was arrested.
Cavataio was arrested in July 1963. He received a four year sentence at the Trial of the 114 against the Mafia in Catanzaro in December 1968, despite an indictment for ten murders..[3] He was sentenced for criminal association and soon left jail when in appeal his sentence was reduced to two years.
[edit]Growing suspicion
The Ciaculli bombing made the other Mafia clans aware of Cavataio’s manipulation of the Mafia War. When the bomb exploded, Salvatore La Barbera was already dead and his brother Angelo La Barbera had fled to Milan, where he was seriously wounded. It became clear that Cavataio – and not the La Barberas – had planted the bomb and fomented much of the trouble.[6]
Other Mafia bosses started to realise Cavataio’s double-crossing role in the Mafia war. In retaliation, during a meeting in Zürich several top Mafia bosses decided to eliminate Cavataio on the instigation of Salvatore Ciaschiteddu Greco who had come all the way from Venezuela. Greco had come to subscribe to Buscetta’s theory about how the First Mafia War began.[9]
Cavataio claimed to have drawn a map of the Palermo Mafia families including the names of all members in an attempt to blackmail his way out of trouble. Such a map was dangerous if the police would get a hand on it.[2]
[edit]Killed by the Mafia


The body of Cavataio after the hit in Viale Lazio
Cavataio and three of his men were killed on December 10, 1969, in the Viale Lazio – a modern street in the smart new northern area of Palermo – by a Mafia hit squad including Bernardo Provenzano, Calogero Bagarella (an elder brother of Leoluca Bagarella the brother-in-law of Totò Riina), Emanuele D’Agostino of Stefano Bontade’s Santa Maria di Gesù Family, Gaetano Grado and Damiano Caruso a soldier of Giuseppe Di Cristina, the Mafia boss of Riesi.[10] The attack is known as the Viale Lazio massacre (Lazio Street Massacre).
The killers entered the office of the construction company of Girolamo Moncada, the builder that previously was connected with Angelo La Barbera and now with Cavataio. Cavataio was able to shoot and kill Calogero Bagarella and wounding Caruso before Provenzano killed him. Provenzano saved the situation with his Beretta 38/A submachine gun and earned himself a reputation as a Mafia killer with the attack.[11] However, according to one of the participants who turned government witness in 1999, Gaetano Grado, it was Provenzano who messed up the attack, shooting too early.[12] In the office 108 bullets had been fired.[3]
Grado said he helped organize the hit and witnessed the murders first hand. "Everybody was scared of Cavataio," according to Grado, a cousin of the pentito Salvatore Contorno. All the mafia soldiers sent to kill Cavataio "were veterans," Grado said. "We all had already murdered at least 10 people."[1]
The composition of the hit squad, according to Buscetta, was a clear indication that the killing had been sanctioned collectively by all the major Sicilian Mafia families: not only did it include Calogero Bagarella from Corleone, and a member of Stefano Bontate’s family in Palermo, but also a soldier of Giuseppe Di Cristina’s family on the other end of Sicily in Riesi.[6] The Viale Lazio bloodbath marked the end of a ‘pax mafiosa’ that had reigned since the Ciaculli massacre until the end of the Trial of the 114.
[edit]Viale Lazio trials
In September 1972, the trial for the Viale Lazio massacre took place; 24 defendants had been rounded up. Filippo and Angelo Moncada, the builder’s sons, were at first imprisoned on suspicion of being part of the plot. In hospital, where he was interned for his gunshot wounds, Fillippo started talking about his father’s meetings with notorious mafiosi, and described how Cavataio had gradually become the real boss in Moncada’s firm.[3]
For the Moncada brothers to ‘talk’ was big news in Sicily. They were released from prison, but their father was placed in custody together with 24 alleged participants in the Viale Lazio massacre who had been rounded up on the evidence given by the two brothers. The final verdict of the jury at the first trial was that no evidence could be substantiated to prove that any of the 24 defendants had been directly responsible for the Viale Lazio massacre.[3]
Many appeals would follow. In 2007, Salvatore Riina and Bernardo Provenzano went on trial for their role in the Viale Lazio Massacre that resulted on Cavataio and his men's deaths. Riina is accused of ordering the massacre and Provenzano is accused of taking part in it.[10][13] In April 2009, nearly forty years after the attack, they were both sentenced to life imprisonment

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Re: Mad San Destefano-pyscho Killer

Unread post by mayugastank » June 20th, 2010, 3:13 am

thewestside wrote:Another mafioso that had a reputation for being a vicious son of a bitch was Carmine Galante.

I read he was directly responsible for the deaths of 8 genovese soldiers? I havent been able to find anything on that though-who did he kill and why if you know?

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Re: Mad San Destefano-pyscho Killer

Unread post by thewestside » June 20th, 2010, 9:31 pm

mayugastank wrote:
thewestside wrote:Another mafioso that had a reputation for being a vicious son of a bitch was Carmine Galante.

I read he was directly responsible for the deaths of 8 genovese soldiers? I havent been able to find anything on that though-who did he kill and why if you know?
Every time I hear about that the number of Genovese guys he supposedly had killed grows bigger and bigger. I personally don't believe it and have never seen any information to show otherwise. The Genovese would have wiped the floor with the Bonannos. In fact, Frank Tieri sent a message to Galante that if he had a problem, he should come and see him.

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