Black Parenting

This is the forum for those who believe that there are other options to gangs and violence and hope to see young people make better choices about their future. Where does change begin?

Moderator: Guest

Post Reply
User avatar
AllhoodPublications
Light Heavy Weight
Light Heavy Weight
Posts: 1206
Joined: October 8th, 2006, 12:58 pm
What city do you live in now?: Montreal
Location: West Coast
Contact:

Black Parenting

Unread post by AllhoodPublications » November 20th, 2008, 1:30 pm

Dear Prospective League of Black Parents Member:

What is the solution to the mass failure of many Black children in our schools, the violence and death that is permeating many Black communities and the economic disaster that is besetting our community? The police can't do it. Social workers can't do it. Teachers can't do it. Elected officials can't do it. And even our pastors and preachers can't do it. Only Black parents can improve the educational, social, emotional and spiritual outcomes for Black children! The solution is simple: Stronger, better Black parents. Across the United States, the educational, social and economic outcomes for most Black children are a catastrophe. In the new global educational and economic order, many, if not most, Black American children cannot compete. If ever there were reasons for Black parents to take action, few are more compelling than the ones listed below:

Only 47% of Black males in America graduate from high school.
The average 17-year-old Black child has the reading and math scores of the average 14- year-old White child.
One out of three Black boys born after 2001 will spend time in jail or prison.
An estimated 50% of Black girls between 14- and 19- years-old have contracted a sexually transmitted disease.
Between 65% to 70% of Black children are born into single-parent, female-headed households.
The rates of Black "kids killing kids" (KKK) and Black youth violence is increasing exponentially across America, including 12 Chicago public school children violently killed in the first 5 weeks of this new school year.
There is only one way to successfully fix the above problems. Black parents must take control of the education of Black children. No other way has worked nor will work. This does not mean that all teachers for Black children must be Black or that all Black children must attend only African-centered schools. It does mean that, ultimately, Black parents are responsible for the education of Black children. Our actions, or inactions, will determine the future of our race.

Please join Black parents across America who know that if we are not organized, our children will not be recognized. If we do not speak up, Black children will have no voice. Black parents must advocate as well as educate. We must take responsibility for the education of our children. We will work in our homes, with our families, with our communities, with our schools and with our government to guarantee the proper and successful education of Black children.

Parental involvement is not enough. Black parents must become co-managers of our children's destiny. We must become the engineers of their success. We must and will actively participate in their educational lives. Please join the Black Star Project's League of Black Parents and commit to a 90-minute meeting, one day a month, for the sake of your child and the future of our race. We will also ask you to join our community PTA chapter or another local chapter so that we can take advantage of existing resources.

League of Black Parent chapters are starting around the country. Please call 773.285.9600 for more information about starting a chapter in your city. Thank you for being in the vanguard of educating and saving Black children.

Sincerely,


Phillip Jackson
Executive Director

SouljahGirl
Middle Weight
Middle Weight
Posts: 624
Joined: November 4th, 2008, 1:58 pm
What city do you live in now?: LA

Re: Black Parenting

Unread post by SouljahGirl » November 20th, 2008, 8:42 pm

AllhoodPublications wrote:Dear Prospective League of Black Parents Member:

What is the solution to the mass failure of many Black children in our schools, the violence and death that is permeating many Black communities and the economic disaster that is besetting our community? The police can't do it. Social workers can't do it. Teachers can't do it. Elected officials can't do it. And even our pastors and preachers can't do it. Only Black parents can improve the educational, social, emotional and spiritual outcomes for Black children! The solution is simple: Stronger, better Black parents. Across the United States, the educational, social and economic outcomes for most Black children are a catastrophe. In the new global educational and economic order, many, if not most, Black American children cannot compete. If ever there were reasons for Black parents to take action, few are more compelling than the ones listed below:

Only 47% of Black males in America graduate from high school.
The average 17-year-old Black child has the reading and math scores of the average 14- year-old White child.
One out of three Black boys born after 2001 will spend time in jail or prison.
An estimated 50% of Black girls between 14- and 19- years-old have contracted a sexually transmitted disease.
Between 65% to 70% of Black children are born into single-parent, female-headed households.
The rates of Black "kids killing kids" (KKK) and Black youth violence is increasing exponentially across America, including 12 Chicago public school children violently killed in the first 5 weeks of this new school year.
There is only one way to successfully fix the above problems. Black parents must take control of the education of Black children. AAAAAMen!! No other way has worked nor will work. This does not mean that all teachers for Black children must be Black or that all Black children must attend only African-centered schools. It does mean that, ultimately, Black parents are responsible for the education of Black children. Our actions, or inactions, will determine the future of our race. PREACH!!

Please join Black parents across America who know that if we are not organized, our children will not be recognized. If we do not speak up, Black children will have no voice. Black parents must advocate as well as educate. We must take responsibility for the education of our children. We will work in our homes, with our families, with our communities, with our schools and with our government to guarantee the proper and successful education of Black children.

Parental involvement is not enough. Black parents must become co-managers of our children's destiny. We must become the engineers of their success. We must and will actively participate in their educational lives. Please join the Black Star Project's League of Black Parents and commit to a 90-minute meeting, one day a month, for the sake of your child and the future of our race. We will also ask you to join our community PTA chapter or another local chapter so that we can take advantage of existing resources.

League of Black Parent chapters are starting around the country. Please call 773.285.9600 for more information about starting a chapter in your city. Thank you for being in the vanguard of educating and saving Black children.

Sincerely,


Phillip Jackson
Executive Director

SouljahGirl
Middle Weight
Middle Weight
Posts: 624
Joined: November 4th, 2008, 1:58 pm
What city do you live in now?: LA

Re: Black Parenting

Unread post by SouljahGirl » December 15th, 2008, 6:06 pm

I owe Black Parents an apoligy. I use to think that we were the only ones who cussed and fussed at our children. I know know that I was wronge. I thought that because I'm only around black parents.

But let me tell you, I was in Nordstroms on Friday and I heard a lady telling her child. Shut the fuck up, sit the fuck down.. I happen to look ( okay I made my self look.. Shut Up!!! Y'all know I'm nosey)

But when I looked out the door the lady was either Persian or Russian or something.. But she was not black nor hispanic..

So to all the Black Parents who's ass I stay in............... I sorry Boo Boo's...

Wait a minute.. No I aint... Y'all be fucking up and I'ma stay in yo ass till it get better.. I'm just glad to see that it aint only us..

Carry on!!

SouljahGirl
Middle Weight
Middle Weight
Posts: 624
Joined: November 4th, 2008, 1:58 pm
What city do you live in now?: LA

Re: Black Parenting

Unread post by SouljahGirl » January 6th, 2009, 11:15 pm

Black parenting must be different in a sense because the back nation is the only nation that I am aware of. That had been totally stripped of its non american culture. By this I mean. All others were given the privelidge of being imarants from other countries. They were allowed to bring there culture with them and even today they are encouraged to to keep their traditions. We on the other hand were seperated from our parents at birth and from birth we were coaxed into believing we were a people who were less than. We suffer from generations and generations of our parents allowing other people to think for us and welfare supporting us. ( but not JUST us ) we have in some way strayeed away from work ethic and have become to excited with the bling bling and will aquire it at any cost. ( Not just us otherrs too) so in a way. Black parenting IS different than just plain o'l parenting....... to be continued

SouljahGirl
Middle Weight
Middle Weight
Posts: 624
Joined: November 4th, 2008, 1:58 pm
What city do you live in now?: LA

Re: Black Parenting

Unread post by SouljahGirl » January 19th, 2009, 7:20 pm

For Immediate Release

STUDENTS SOUGHT FOR LIVE RADIOYouth Poets To Express Depth of Concerns San Bernardino, CA. "Courageous Conversations" Internet radio show is looking for high school students to be guest panelists during its upcoming shows to discuss the impact education, educators and decision-makers are having on their generation in and out of the classroom.

The format allows constructive and positive interaction between guests and callers. Student groups are encouraged to participate and express those views they believe will impact both their academic and economic futures. "Courageous Conversations" is a collaboration between educator, doctoral candidate and show producer Ms. Hafeeza Majeed of Little Rock, AR., and Mr. Terry Boykins, social entrepreneur, founder of StreetPositive.com, and organizer of The Million Father March based in Grand Terrace, CA.

As part of the show's development to address issues concerning youth and education, the pair began working on a format to discuss "What's Right With Our Youth?" And, their listening audience around the nation is fast expanding. When asked about what they hope to accomplish, Boykins stated "by participating in such dialogue, as students, they will afford educators and parents, alike, an opportunity to gain greater perspective on issues often missed and misunderstood. And, the thing we are attempting to do with this format is bridge the gap and move to promising solutions with regard to our youth, so they are neither missed nor misunderstood socially, academically or economically."


During the January 18th and 25th airings, a group of youth poets from the "Lets Write Out Loud" program, headed by Ms. Monette Miles, will share their works in an effort to have a national audience gain better insight as to how they use literacy and poetry to provide an effective means for youth to express their hurts and concerns in an ongoing effort to be heard.

Students, student groups, parents and educators interested in becoming guests should contact (909) 895-3765. Or, visit http://www.streetpositive.com. "Courageous Conversations" is a live broadcast airing the third and fourth Sundays at 8pm EST.

SouljahGirl
Middle Weight
Middle Weight
Posts: 624
Joined: November 4th, 2008, 1:58 pm
What city do you live in now?: LA

Re: Black Parenting

Unread post by SouljahGirl » January 19th, 2009, 7:27 pm

Harvard University FREE for qualified students from low-income families



Harvard University has announced that undergraduate students from low-income families will pay no tuition. In making the announcement, former Harvard president Lawrence H. Summers said, "When only ten percent of the students in elite higher education come from families in the lower half of the income distribution, we are not doing enough. We are not doing enough in bringing elite higher education to the lower half of the income distribution."

If you know of a family earning less than $60,000 a year with an honor student graduating from high school soon, Harvard University wants to pay the tuition. The prestigious university recently announced that undergraduate students from low-income families can go to Harvard for free... no tuition and no student loans!

To find out more about Harvard offering free tuition for families making less than $60,000 a year, visit Harvard's financial aid website at: http://www.harvard.edu/admissions/

monsta6060
Straw Weight
Straw Weight
Posts: 60
Joined: September 4th, 2008, 9:09 pm
What city do you live in now?: rsc

Re: Black Parenting

Unread post by monsta6060 » January 23rd, 2009, 1:36 am

We have to guide our kids better. I'm 28 and i have a 14 year old daugther. ( I know started young) I be on her but i give her her space and right now we saving money so she can hopefuly get into Harvard. Please send pray for use for this to happen. Be on your kids to be better then you. 2 many was to get rich or make money in a legal way .

SouljahGirl
Middle Weight
Middle Weight
Posts: 624
Joined: November 4th, 2008, 1:58 pm
What city do you live in now?: LA

Re: Black Parenting

Unread post by SouljahGirl » January 23rd, 2009, 11:04 am

monsta6060 wrote:2 many was to get rich or make money in a legal way .
I was up half the night trying to figure out a way to teach us that we got to get out of this underground economy.

It is so EASY to make money legally. As a matter fo fact it's easier. No watching your back, not running from the police, no court cased, no probation , no parole.

It's as if all the knowledge of doing shit the legal way is the best kept secret from the hoods. We the elders, are breeding generations and generations of felons and we don't even see our role in the destruction.

They replaced the labor industry with the dope industry. They feed our mind full of BS music and BS programing while they make sure that their children are well educated.

Remember when we were promised 40 acres and a mule.It's like they took our 40 acre's and gave us 40 o/z. They replaced our hunger for knowledge with a blunt.. some Cush.. Now all our young people are running around here saying: Let's all smoke blunt after blunt after blunt after blunt. Non stop. Just keep smoking all day eerrr day.. Smoke smoke smoke. You young people think you know everything. It's all cool to smoke out of control like that.. NOT!!!

Bottom line is that it's hard work to change. and some folks just lazy as hell.. They too lazy to study, to lazy to work and too lazy to fight for their own dam rights..

Luckely.. That aint us!!

SouljahGirl
Middle Weight
Middle Weight
Posts: 624
Joined: November 4th, 2008, 1:58 pm
What city do you live in now?: LA

Re: Black Parenting

Unread post by SouljahGirl » January 23rd, 2009, 11:06 am

The Black Star Project Joins
Open Society Institute's Campaign for Black Male Achievement

Focus will be on the Million Father March and recruiting Black men as tutors and mentors in the lives of young Black males


Chicago, January 22, 2009-The Black Star Project will receive $50,000 from the Open Society Institute to support the Million Father March and a school-based rogram that engages Black men as mentors and tutors in the Chicago Public School System. The grant was awarded through OSI's Campaign for Black Male Achievement, a three-year grantmaking initiative to address, and help reverse, the ways in which African American boys and men are stigmatized, criminalized and excluded from the U.S. economic and political mainstream.


Even as Americans elected their first Black president, the end of 2008 saw an onslaught of dire reports on the educational, social and economic outcomes for Black males in America. Sky-high dropout rates for high-school students, an out-of-control murder rate for 14- to 17-year olds and a 72 percent unemployment rate for high-school dropouts paint a bleak forecast for young Black men.


The Black Star Project has joined with the Open Society Institute's Campaign for Black Male Achievement to address these issues. With the support of the Campaign, Black Star will expand its successful Million Father March and also launch an initiative that uses school-based strategies to recruit Black male tutors and mentors. Research by the National Fatherhood Initiative shows that children, male and female, perform better in school, at home and in life when their fathers take an active and positive role in their lives. Additionally, Black male tutors and mentors provide measurable guidance for Black boys and young Black males in America.


"Black Star's combined strategy of national advocacy to increase fathers' participating in their children's education and local recruitment of male tutors will have a positive impact on young Black male students and their fathers," said Shawn Dove, manager of the Campaign for Black Male Achievement. "The Open Society Institute is proud to support The Black Star Project's efforts to improve life outcomes for Black boys and men."


Black Star Project programs include the Million Father March, which in 2008 occurred in 475 cities with 600,000 men taking their children back to school on the first day; the Fathers Club, where Black men and their children enhance bonds around educational, recreational and sporting venues and events; the Men in Schools Program, where men serve in schools as mentors, tutors, reading coaches, chaperones, hall guards, lunch-room monitors and playground supervisors, as well as board members; and Take a Black Male to Worship Day, where members of churches, mosques, temples, synagogues and other faith bodies invite young Black males into their worship services.

To learn more about the Open Society Institute's Campaign for Black Male Achievement please click on http://www.soros.org/initiatives/usprograms/focus/cbma.


Phillip Jackson is the founder and executive director of The Black Star Project in Chicago, Illinois. For more information about its work to educate and save a generation of young Black men, please call 773.285.9600, email blackstar1000@ameritech.net or visit http://www.blackstarproject.org.

Studies show...fathers matter
significantly!

63% of youth suicides are from fatherless homes
(Source: U.S. D.H.H.S., Bureau of the Census)
90% of all homeless and runaway children are from fatherless homes
85% of all children that exhibit behavioral disorders come from fatherless homes
(Source: Center for Disease Control)
80% of rapists motivated with displaced anger come from fatherless homes
(Source: Criminal Justice & Behavior, Vol 14, p. 403-26, 1978.)
71% of all high school dropouts come from fatherless homes
(Source: National Principals Report on the State of High Schools )
75% of all adolescent patients in chemical abuse centers come from fatherless homes
(Source: Rainbows for all God`s Children.)
70% of juveniles in state-operated institutions come from fatherless homes
(Source: U.S. Dept. of Justice, Special Report, Sept 1988)
85% of all youths sitting in prisons grew up in a fatherless home
(Source: Fulton Co. Georgia jail populations, Texas Dept. of Corrections 1992)
These statistics show that children from a fatherless home are:

5 times more likely to commit suicide
32 times more likely to run away
20 times more likely to have behavioral disorders
Boys are 14 times more likely to commit rape
9 times more likely to drop out of high school
10 times more likely to abuse chemical substances
9 times more likely to end up in a state-operated institution
20 times more like to end up in prison
Fatherlessness is the single most important sociological issue of our day. So how do we reverse the trend? All Pro Dad hopes to be a part of the solution. Click on Http://www.allprodad.com/ and find out more about us and how you can help be part of the answer.

Mcminister
Heavy Weight
Heavy Weight
Posts: 2900
Joined: July 4th, 2006, 4:15 pm
Location: Africa
Contact:

Re: Black Parenting

Unread post by Mcminister » January 31st, 2009, 2:18 pm

i don think ima call my son ...."come here lil nigga" ..i dono man somethin in me tells me i cant..

wen i look at my daughter i c a lil angel...i cant ever even think bout cussin infront of her..or sayin nigga..and al this stuff

SouljahGirl
Middle Weight
Middle Weight
Posts: 624
Joined: November 4th, 2008, 1:58 pm
What city do you live in now?: LA

Re: Black Parenting

Unread post by SouljahGirl » February 2nd, 2009, 9:06 am

Mcminister wrote:i don think ima call my son ...."come here lil nigga" ..i dono man somethin in me tells me i cant..

wen i look at my daughter i c a lil angel...i cant ever even think bout cussin infront of her..or sayin nigga..and al this stuff
Good for you. You have just given your seed a better chance for survival. Truth Be Told. We should clone you....

cliffard
Middle Weight
Middle Weight
Posts: 687
Joined: March 20th, 2007, 5:03 pm

Re: Black Parenting

Unread post by cliffard » February 2nd, 2009, 9:28 am

Mcminister wrote:i don think ima call my son ...."come here lil nigga" ..i dono man somethin in me tells me i cant..
is that a standard manner of address? fuckin sad if it is....

SouljahGirl
Middle Weight
Middle Weight
Posts: 624
Joined: November 4th, 2008, 1:58 pm
What city do you live in now?: LA

Re: Black Parenting

Unread post by SouljahGirl » February 2nd, 2009, 1:02 pm

cliffard wrote:
Mcminister wrote:i don think ima call my son ...."come here lil nigga" ..i dono man somethin in me tells me i cant..
is that a standard manner of address? fuckin sad if it is....
Maybe not standard. But it is a way that some folks address their children. We ( in the hoods ) often use the word nigga ( nugga) as a term of endearment. We use it to discribe our boyfriends. our homies , the man next door..ect..

Some folks don't see it as a negative..

cliffard
Middle Weight
Middle Weight
Posts: 687
Joined: March 20th, 2007, 5:03 pm

Re: Black Parenting

Unread post by cliffard » February 2nd, 2009, 5:47 pm

souljah not such a big thing in uk for black people to call each other nigga, never really heard it at all when i was coming up,there wasnt nothing good about that word in the 80s, it was being hung on people to downgrade them, not a positive thing in any shape or form. that started to change with the us influence of rap etc. but even now sounds a bit wanna be to hear english black people calling each other 'my nigga' although it is more common. i understand the deal with it being a term of endearment in the us for your boys, or for a woman to her dude etc., but to me it seems real harsh to be calling your youth 'lil nigga', that just seems rough and wrong to me.

SouljahGirl
Middle Weight
Middle Weight
Posts: 624
Joined: November 4th, 2008, 1:58 pm
What city do you live in now?: LA

Re: Black Parenting

Unread post by SouljahGirl » February 3rd, 2009, 12:37 pm

cliffard wrote:souljah not such a big thing in uk for black people to call each other nigga, never really heard it at all when i was coming up,there wasnt nothing good about that word in the 80s, it was being hung on people to downgrade them, not a positive thing in any shape or form. that started to change with the us influence of rap etc. but even now sounds a bit wanna be to hear english black people calling each other 'my nigga' although it is more common. i understand the deal with it being a term of endearment in the us for your boys, or for a woman to her dude etc., but to me it seems real harsh to be calling your youth 'lil nigga', that just seems rough and wrong to me.
Yeah, but people do it. Have you ever hear the discussion between Dr. Cornell West and Tavis Smiley Re: the N word?? I'll see can I find it

SouljahGirl
Middle Weight
Middle Weight
Posts: 624
Joined: November 4th, 2008, 1:58 pm
What city do you live in now?: LA

Re: Black Parenting

Unread post by SouljahGirl » February 3rd, 2009, 12:54 pm



This is at his Album release party we attended in Downtown LA. The Album is a MUST HAVE for all people. BLACK MEN WHO MEAN BUSINESS ( S EE ME.. DO YOU SEE ME?)

SouljahGirl
Middle Weight
Middle Weight
Posts: 624
Joined: November 4th, 2008, 1:58 pm
What city do you live in now?: LA

Re: Black Parenting

Unread post by SouljahGirl » March 5th, 2009, 1:58 pm

AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDENTS ARE NOT APPLYING


Even if you do not have a college-aged child at home, please share this with someone who does, pass this scholarship information on to anyone and everyone that comes to mind. Though there are a number of companies and organizations that have donated money for scholarship use to African Americans, a great deal of the money is being returned because of a lack of interest.


No one is going to knock on our doors and ask if we can use a scholarship.

Take the initiative to get your children involved. There is no need for money to be returned to donating companies because we fail to apply for it.


Please pass this information on to family members, nieces, nephews, friends with children etc. We must get the word out that money is available. If you are a college student or getting ready to become one, you probably already know how useful additional money can be. Our youth really could use these scholarships. Thanks!! * (If clicking on the link doesn't work, then typ e in the Web site address manually.)


1) BELL LABS FELLOWSHIPS FOR UNDER REPRESENTED MINORITIES http://www.bell-labs.com/fellowships/CRFP/info.html

2) Student Inventors Scholarships http://www.invent.org/collegiate http://www.invent.org/collegiate/

3) Student Video Scholarships http://www.christophers.org/vidcon2k.html

4) Coca-Cola Two Year College Scholarships http://www.coca-colascholars.org/programs.html

5) Holocaust Remembrance Scholarships http://holocaust.hklaw.com/

6) Ayn Rand Essay Scholarships http://www.aynrand.org/contests/

7) Brand Essay Competition http://www.instituteforbrandleadership. ... 2Rules.htm

8) Gates Millennium Scholarshi ps (major) http://www.gmsp.org/nominationmaterials/read.dbm?ID=12

9) Xerox Scholarships for Students http://www2.xerox.com/go/xrx/about_xero ... detail.jsp

10) Sports Scholarships and Internships http://www.ncaa.org/about/scholarships.html

11) National Assoc. of Black Journalists Scholarships (NABJ) http://www.nabj.org/html/studentsvcs.html

12) Saul T. Wilson Scholarships (Veterinary) http://www.aphis.usda.gov/mb/mrphr/jobs/stw.html

13) Thurgood Marshall Scholarship Fund http://www.thurgoodmarshallfund.org/sk_v6.cfm

14) FinAid: The Smart Students Guide to Financial Aid scholarships) http://www.finaid.org/

15) Presidential Freedom Scholarships http://www.nationalservice.org/scholarships/

16) Microsoft Scholarship Program http://www.microsoft.com/college/schola ... nority.asp

17) WiredScholar Free Scholarship Search http://www.wiredscholar.com/paying/scho ... rch/pay_sc holarship _search.jsp

0A

18) Hope Scholarships &Lifetime Credits http://www.ed.gov/inits/hope/

19) William Randolph Hearst Endowed Scholarship for Minority Students http://www.apsanet.org/PS/grants/aspen3.cfm

20) Multiple List of Minority Scholarships http://gehon.ir.miami.edu/financial-ass ... /blackhtml

21) Guaranteed Scholarships http://www.guaranteed-scholarships.com/

22) BOEING scholarships (soma e HBCU connects) http://www.boeing.com/companyoffices/ed ... holarships

23) Easley National Scholarship Program http://www.naas.org/senior.htm

24) Maryland Artists Scholarships http://www.maef.org/

26) Jacki Tuckfield Memorial Graduate Business Scholarship (for AA students in South Florida )

http://www.jackituckfield.org/

27) Historically Black College & University Scholarships http://www.iesabroad.org/info/hbcu.htm

28) Actuarial Scholarships for Minorit y Students http://wwwbeanactuary.org/minority/scholarships.htm

29) International Students Scholarships &Aid Help http://www.iefa.org/

30) College Board Scholarship Search http://cbweb10p.collegeboard.org/fundfi ... ind01.html

31) Burger King Scholarship Program http://www.bkscholars.csfa.org/

32) Siemens Westinghouse Competition http://www.siemens-foundationorg/

33) GE and LuLac Scholarship Funds http://www.lulac.org/Programs/Scholar.html

34) CollegeNet ' s Scholarship Database http://mach25.collegenet.com/cgi-bin/M25/index

35) Union Sponsored Scholarships and Aid http://www.aflcioorg/scholarships/scholar.htm

36) Federal Scholarships &Aid Gateways 25 Scholarship Gateways from Black Excel http://www.blackexcel.org/ 25scholarships.htm

37) Scholarship &Financial Aid Help http://www.blackexcel.org/fin-sch.htm

38) Scholarship Links (Ed Finance Group) http://www.efg.net/ /link_scholarship.htm

39) FAFSA On The Web (Your Key Aid Form &Info) http://www.fafsa.ed.gov/

40) Aid &Resources For Re-Entry Students http://www.back2college.com/

41) Scholarships and Fellowships http://www.osc.cuny.edu/sep/links.html

42) Scholarships for Study in Paralegal Studies http://www.paralegals.org/Choice/2000west.htm

43) HBCU Packard Sit Abroad Scholarships (for study around the world) http://www.sit.edu/studyabroad/packard_nomination.html

44) Scholarship and Fellowship Opportunities http://ccmi.uchicago.edu/schl1.html

45) INROADS internships http://www.inroads.org/ 46) ACT-SO bEURoeOlympics of the Mind "A Scholarships http://www.naacp.org/work/actso/act-so.shtml

47) Black Alliance for Educational Options Scholarships http://www.baeo.org/options/privatelyfinanced.jsp 48) ScienceNet Scholarship Listing http://www.sciencenet.emory.edu/undergr ... ships.html

49) Grad uate Fellowships For Minorities Nationwide http://cuinfo.cornell.edu/Student/GRFN/ ... MINORITIES

50) RHODES SCHOLARSHIPS AT OXFORD http://www.rhodesscholarorg/info.html

51) The Roothbert Scholarship Fund http://www.roothbertfund.com/ "Friends are angels who lift us to our feet when our wings have trouble remembering how to fly." - Anonymous

Peace
Michael

COURAGE

It takes courage to interrogate yourself.

It takes courage to look in the mirror and see past your reflection to who you really are when you take off the mask, when you’re not performing the same old routines and social roles. It takes courage to ask. How did I become so well-adjusted to injustice?

Cornel West

YUNGHUSTLE1000
Straw Weight
Straw Weight
Posts: 30
Joined: April 19th, 2009, 10:34 am
What city do you live in now?: PALMDALE

Re: Black Parenting

Unread post by YUNGHUSTLE1000 » April 20th, 2009, 1:14 pm

THE BLK COMMUNITY AS A WHOLE WE ARE TURING AROUND SLOWY BUT ITS PROGESS MAN

SouljahGirl
Middle Weight
Middle Weight
Posts: 624
Joined: November 4th, 2008, 1:58 pm
What city do you live in now?: LA

Re: Black Parenting

Unread post by SouljahGirl » April 20th, 2009, 3:43 pm

YUNGHUSTLE1000 wrote:THE BLK COMMUNITY AS A WHOLE WE ARE TURING AROUND SLOWY BUT ITS PROGESS MAN
Yes it is. And I am so very pleased.

SouljahGirl
Middle Weight
Middle Weight
Posts: 624
Joined: November 4th, 2008, 1:58 pm
What city do you live in now?: LA

Re: Black Parenting

Unread post by SouljahGirl » May 11th, 2009, 8:37 am

MOREHOUSE SUMMER PROGRAM - 10th &11th Grade
You may know someone . . . Please pass on this opportunity for our young men. . . .

Any Brothers or Sisters who have Sons, Nephews or younger brothers please read....

Morehouse Summer Program @ Morehouse College in Atlanta , GA - will be offering a Summer Institute (Project Identity) for African-American
males entering the 10th and 11th grades.

Three weeks at Morehouse - June 7 - 28
Creative Writing -
SAT Prep -
Debate -
Pre-Calculus -
Leadership development -
Enrichment activities -
$400 fee (includes meals, housing and activities).

PROJECT IDENTITY is a federally funded program designed to stimulate interest in college attendance and the awareness of college entrance requirements for African-American and other minority males attending middle school. The Project aims to help to develop and sustain the capacity of middle schools to prepare these young boys for high school and post-secondary education. By providing a network of support, particularly for the adults who influence middle school students, specifically, their counselors and families, Project Identity strives to channel and direct more minority males to higher education. Project Identity will give special attention to boys from backgrounds and communities that historically have not encouraged large numbers to pursue, enroll and succeed in post-secondary education. OUR VISION The vision of Project Identity is to expose middle school male students to the best academic resources and cultural activities so that learning becomes a source of inspiration to not only pursue the college option but to do so with enthusiasm and vigor. By assisting both parents and school counselors, Project Identity will create a learning environment for participants that extends beyond the classroom.

FOR MORE INFO GO TO: http://www.morehous e.edu/projectide ntity/index. html



Scherri Harps
(909) 200-7073 cell

SouljahGirl
Middle Weight
Middle Weight
Posts: 624
Joined: November 4th, 2008, 1:58 pm
What city do you live in now?: LA

Re: Black Parenting

Unread post by SouljahGirl » June 23rd, 2009, 1:55 pm

I think that before we can become affective at parenting. We must first.. Grow up Ourselves.

So many of us are of the age where we should be making better choices, better descisions. But instead we live as though we are still in our youth. No responsability, no accountability.

If you want to directley affect the plight of the black youth in America. You must first look at the attitudes, charecteristics, behavior and the moral fiber of the Black man and the Black woman.

For it is we, that rear the children. They will become us eventually. So.......... Mr and Mrs want to help the youth.. Be the best YOU that you can be. Don't be a liar or your children will lie to you. Don't be a theif or your children will steal from you.

Don't be a gossip or go around bath mouthing each other.

Create in yourself a Moral Fiber. Only then will we not rear garbage attiude haveing, garbage vocabulary having and Truth Be Told............ garbage ass young people..

Take it like you wanna take it........... I could care less

User avatar
AllhoodPublications
Light Heavy Weight
Light Heavy Weight
Posts: 1206
Joined: October 8th, 2006, 12:58 pm
What city do you live in now?: Montreal
Location: West Coast
Contact:

Re: Black Parenting

Unread post by AllhoodPublications » June 24th, 2009, 12:41 pm

I think that before we can become affective at parenting. We must first.. Grow up Ourselves.

Yep. I dont think I matured until I was already past 30. And I see some dudes 45 that still havent grown up.

Don't be a gossip or go around bath mouthing each other.

I'm not very optimistic about this one. That seems to be a huge problem everywhere.

Take it like you wanna take it........... I could care less

We have to surround ourselves, and surround the YOUTH with positive people and positive things.

Klaxon
Straw Weight
Straw Weight
Posts: 30
Joined: July 19th, 2009, 2:31 am
What city do you live in now?: Los Angeles

Re: Black Parenting

Unread post by Klaxon » July 21st, 2009, 5:45 am

The two-parent nuclear family is the most stable and supportive social/living-arrangement ever invented. That's not an opinion, its just statistical fact. Our society as a whole went wrong when we strayed away from encouraging and emphasizing that lifestyle. This isn't just a minority problem. White families are also being torn apart in modern America. Unfortunately Blacks and Latinos bear the brunt due to the additional factors of poverty and gang culture being present. We need a new direction for American society. This is an American *cultural* problem by the way. Notice there are parts of the world (Asia, some parts of Latin America, some parts of Africa) that are many, many more times poorer than the worst ghetto in the US, but the family structure has managed to survive and crime is not as prevalent.

SouljahGirl
Middle Weight
Middle Weight
Posts: 624
Joined: November 4th, 2008, 1:58 pm
What city do you live in now?: LA

Re: Black Parenting

Unread post by SouljahGirl » July 23rd, 2009, 5:04 pm

Klaxon wrote:The two-parent nuclear family is the most stable and supportive social/living-arrangement ever invented. That's not an opinion, its just statistical fact. Our society as a whole went wrong when we strayed away from encouraging and emphasizing that lifestyle. This isn't just a minority problem. White families are also being torn apart in modern America. Unfortunately Blacks and Latinos bear the brunt due to the additional factors of poverty and gang culture being present. We need a new direction for American society. This is an American *cultural* problem by the way. Notice there are parts of the world (Asia, some parts of Latin America, some parts of Africa) that are many, many more times poorer than the worst ghetto in the US, but the family structure has managed to survive and crime is not as prevalent.
Where do we begin?

SouljahGirl
Middle Weight
Middle Weight
Posts: 624
Joined: November 4th, 2008, 1:58 pm
What city do you live in now?: LA

Re: Black Parenting

Unread post by SouljahGirl » August 19th, 2009, 10:51 pm

Black Parenting.. Yeah right.. What are we teaching ? We aint even got a job. So we dam sure are not teching work ethic.

What are we teaching. What are our parenting skills? Where did we get them? Hell I drive around hoods all day long and I see litle sister with babies in a stroller walikg around all day. Hair uncombed, in pajama's, talking loud.

Or what about the one who's baby is walking to slow and she yell.. GET YO STUPD ASS UP HER. and snatch the baby by the arm..

Black Parenting.. Yeah Right!!! All y'all black folks that got the education is too scared to come in the hoods and teach us how to transistion into mainstream socety. Because let's face it. We are in a world of our own. We don't think like mainstream society.

We are gutter. We have had to scrape and srounge and take hand outs and welfare and function with inadequit education. man please...

Don't get me started

SouljahGirl
Middle Weight
Middle Weight
Posts: 624
Joined: November 4th, 2008, 1:58 pm
What city do you live in now?: LA

Re: Black Parenting

Unread post by SouljahGirl » October 2nd, 2009, 2:32 pm


SouljahGirl
Middle Weight
Middle Weight
Posts: 624
Joined: November 4th, 2008, 1:58 pm
What city do you live in now?: LA

Re: Black Parenting

Unread post by SouljahGirl » January 29th, 2010, 11:40 pm

This was a good thread

Post Reply

Return to “Prevention, Intervention, Education and Awareness”