Keita Rock

Discuss anything music from hip-hop to R&B to alternative music. Also included here are news worthy articles as it relates to music, musicians and the industry.

Keita Rock

Postby pistolslanga » May 24th, 2007, 7:55 pm

ive heard bout this guy a lil, he pops up here n there, ive heard like 1 of his tracks haha, sounds real dope, anyone got any info on him? some dudes was saying suge was scared of his ass or something when he was signed to deathrow and when he left, because suge was bullyin fools, but not touchin keita rock...anyone got any idea who he is?

song i heard by him is Keita Rock - Projects
pistolslanga
Light Heavy Weight
Light Heavy Weight
 
Posts: 1342
Joined: May 5th, 2006, 2:04 pm
Location: oakland

Postby Trav » May 24th, 2007, 8:01 pm

I think he from the same hood as Kurupt the 60's i believe. I know he a real nigga they had some court documents up here not to long saying that the 8 trays tried to kill him ans ended up killin his man. Never heard none of his music tho. Matter of fact he got a Death Row tattoo right on his face.
Trav
Middle Weight
Middle Weight
 
Posts: 595
Joined: July 21st, 2005, 8:45 pm
Location: CT
What city do you live in now?: the Bottom

Postby pistolslanga » May 24th, 2007, 8:02 pm

Trav wrote:I think he from the same hood as Kurupt the 60's i believe. I know he a real nigga they had some court documents up here not to long saying that the 8 trays tried to kill him ans ended up killin his man. Never heard none of his music tho. Matter of fact he got a Death Row tattoo right on his face.


oh, well if you listen to deathrow's too gangsta for the radio album hes on there, didnt hear nothin bout him banging 60s tho...

i thought he was a watts locsta or something

any idea why the trays tried to do him in?
pistolslanga
Light Heavy Weight
Light Heavy Weight
 
Posts: 1342
Joined: May 5th, 2006, 2:04 pm
Location: oakland

Postby pistolslanga » May 24th, 2007, 8:03 pm

weird thing is hes like tray dee, when his name pop up muthafukkas be like oh that muthafukkas real as fukk n shit, was he a OG or someshit?
pistolslanga
Light Heavy Weight
Light Heavy Weight
 
Posts: 1342
Joined: May 5th, 2006, 2:04 pm
Location: oakland

Postby Trav » May 24th, 2007, 8:08 pm

I'm ain't from Cali so you would have to ask one of them niggaz. I got some fam in la thats how i know a little bit. But dude look like an OG Spider Loc refered to dude as an OG before. The shit with the 8 Trays is in one of these forums somewhere, search and it got every detail on what happened that night. He from the 60's put i guess he ain't on that shit no more cause he atleast use to try to get peace treaties poppin. But i guess he did so much in the streets niggaz ain't givin a fuck and still tryin to body him.
Trav
Middle Weight
Middle Weight
 
Posts: 595
Joined: July 21st, 2005, 8:45 pm
Location: CT
What city do you live in now?: the Bottom

Postby pistolslanga » May 24th, 2007, 8:10 pm

Trav wrote:I'm ain't from Cali so you would have to ask one of them niggaz. I got some fam in la thats how i know a little bit. But dude look like an OG Spider Loc refered to dude as an OG before. The shit with the 8 Trays is in one of these forums somewhere, search and it got every detail on what happened that night. He from the 60's put i guess he ain't on that shit no more cause he atleast use to try to get peace treaties poppin. But i guess he did so much in the streets niggaz ain't givin a fu-- and still tryin to body him.


oh foreal, thats aiight, yea i got fam from L.A. all over, bout to ask em fools who he is.

and what section did them court docs posted @?
pistolslanga
Light Heavy Weight
Light Heavy Weight
 
Posts: 1342
Joined: May 5th, 2006, 2:04 pm
Location: oakland

Postby pistolslanga » May 24th, 2007, 8:12 pm

aww NM yea he is from the 60s, was representing L.A. dodgers n reppin 60sgang in his tracks




Swoop G, let me put you up on some project shit
In Southern California, niggas call 'em the bricks
Some bang Blood... some bang Crip
I met a bad ass, yellow-bone, project bitch
So you know, like I know
That I'm assed-out to the Pablo's
In the blue Ford
Blue Khaks
Blue Chucks, with the tongue fold
Pablo's ??? from the parkin' lot
A nigga life on the line, for a piece of cock
So I grabbed my 4-5, out the stash spot
Put it to my side, and hang through the parkin' lot
Little niggas like: "Blood, that's Keita Rock...
He fucks with the big home boy Stutter-Box"
So back the fuck up, nigga
You're crowdin' my space
It's the nigga with that L.A. Dodger face
Death Row blew a flame
Piru, 60 gang
And every project that I bang through, respect my name
pistolslanga
Light Heavy Weight
Light Heavy Weight
 
Posts: 1342
Joined: May 5th, 2006, 2:04 pm
Location: oakland

Postby pistolslanga » May 24th, 2007, 8:13 pm

fixin those lyrics, its Pueblos Bishops, just copy n pasted that shit
pistolslanga
Light Heavy Weight
Light Heavy Weight
 
Posts: 1342
Joined: May 5th, 2006, 2:04 pm
Location: oakland

Postby Trav » May 24th, 2007, 8:25 pm

Its right here

Court information about the Eight Tray Gangster Crips killing King Lou, a Rollin 60 crip in October 2004.
It says Keitaroc, mentioned in Monster Kody's book, was the initial target.

http://www.courtinfo.ca.gov/opinions/nonpub/B186804.DOC



Filed 10/11/06 P. v. Jones CA2/7

NOT TO BE PUBLISHED IN THE OFFICIAL REPORTS

California Rules of Court, rule 977(a), prohibits courts and parties from citing or relying on opinions not certified for publication or ordered published, except as specified by rule 977(b). This opinion has not been certified for publication or ordered published for purposes of rule 977.

IN THE COURT OF APPEAL OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA

SECOND APPELLATE DISTRICT

DIVISION SEVEN


THE PEOPLE,

Plaintiff and Respondent,

v.

WILSON MACVAY JONES,

Defendant and Appellant.
B186804

(Los Angeles County
Super. Ct. No. BA 274191)

APPEAL from a judgment of the Superior Court of Los Angeles County. Norman J. Shapiro, Judge. Affirmed.
Victor J. Morse, under appointment by the Court of Appeal for Defendant and Appellant.
Bill Lockyer, Attorney General, Robert R. Anderson, Chief Assistant Attorney General, Pamela C. Hamanaka, Senior Assistant Attorney General, Ana R. Duarte and Stacy S. Schwartz, Deputy Attorneys General, for Plaintiff and Respondent.

__________________________



Defendant Wilson MacVay Jones appeals his conviction of first degree murder (Pen. Code, § 187, subd. (a)) arising out of a gang-related shooting. Defendant contends that the trial court committed reversible error in permitting the prosecution to present testimony amounting to an expert opinion that a third party could not have committed the crime. We affirm.

FACTUAL BACKGROUND AND PROCEDURAL HISTORY
Louis “King Lou” Davenport, a member of the Rolling 60s gang, was shot to death on October 31, 2004, while visiting the Motorcycle Club, an after-hours club at 88th Street and Western Avenue located in Eight-Trey gang territory. Defendant is a member of the Eight-Trey gang. The prosecution’s principal evidence at trial consisted of three eyewitnesses to the shooting. Defendant contended a third party member of another gang, Hashim Cridell (Cripto), was responsible because Cridell made statements he had shot someone on the night King Lou was killed.
A. Prosecution Evidence.
1. Eyewitness Testimony.
On October 31, 2004, Lunesa White and two of her friends, Lorie Lewis and Shanice, drove to the Motorcycle Club. White is an adult; Lewis and Shanice were underage. White and Lewis testified that they arrived about 2:00 a.m. and parked in a lot on Western and sat in the car for about five or 10 minutes smoking a marijuana cigarette. Someone next to the car window told White that there were “60s” inside the Club, which Lewis understood to mean a gang. King Lou called Lewis on the phone, and they agreed to meet at the Club.
They got out and went towards the Club, and White saw Nakia Whitman parked in her car. White also saw defendant, who was wearing an orange shirt, run towards Whitman’s car and then return to the street corner.
When White, Lewis and Shanice went into the Club, Defendant was inside the Club talking to some males. The three left the Club, and Lewis saw King Lou talking to someone. White and Lewis heard some arguing coming from the corner of Western and 88th; White heard cursing and somebody said “fu-- 60.” White could not see any faces, nor could she tell who had yelled “fu-- 60.” There were a lot of people standing around; Lewis saw about four unknown males talking to King Lou. White saw King Lou and defendant engaged in a fist fight. Defendant hit King Lou’s head on the cement. King Lou got up and started walking towards his car.
White and Lewis heard gunshots. Defendant ran towards Whitman’s car on the passenger side and the car drove off. White did not see a gun, nor did she see anyone fire a gun. Lewis did not see who pulled out the gun, but she could see it, and the person holding it was shooting at King Lou. Lewis saw King Lou fall face first near Whitman’s car. Lewis saw defendant jump out of Whitman’s car and shoot King Lou while he was lying on the ground.
Lewis, White and Shanice ran to their van and crouched inside. Lewis testified she could see the shooting from inside their van, and saw defendant shoot the victim from about four feet away. White drove the car over next to where King Lou was lying on the ground. White called 911, and waited for the police to come, but when they arrived she left and did not speak to them about what had happened because Lewis and Shanice were underage. White did not want to be a “snitch,” because in her neighborhood she would be subject to retaliation if she spoke to the police. Later, however, she did tell police what she had seen.
Quanisha Rachal testified she went to the Club with defendant and Whitman. They parked behind the Club and sat in the car and talked for about 30 minutes. Defendant got out and left; Rachal and Whitman remained in the car talking for another 20 minutes. They went into the Club and saw Keitarock, who belonged to the 60s gang. Rachal went to get some cigarettes at a gas station; when she returned to the Club she and Whitman noticed that defendant was talking to some girls across the street. Whitman grabbed defendant and pulled him away. Defendant mentioned that something was going to happen to Keitarock when he came out of the Club.
King Lou arrived, parked his car in the parking lot and came over to speak to Rachal and Whitman. He asked if there were any “tramps” there, meaning members of the Eight-Trey gang. Whitman told him that there were “a whole lot up in here.” She asked King Lou to leave, and to call Kietarock to tell him to get out of the Club. King Lou walked off. Defendant came up to them right afterwards, and asked who King Lou was. Whitman told defendant it was “King Lou from the 60s.” Defendant walked away, leaving Rachal and Whitman standing by the car.
Rachal noticed there was a fight going on at the corner of 88th and Western. Rachal heard gunshots come from the location where the fight was taking place, and ran to the car and got in. She saw King Lou running from the fight, with defendant behind him. Defendant stood in the middle of the street and started shooting at King Lou. King Lou dropped to his knees when he got to the sidewalk. Defendant walked up behind him and shot him. King Lou fell face first onto the concrete. Defendant grabbed Whitman and got into Whitman’s car with Rachal and the three of them left. Whitman was driving. Defendant told them they were not after King Lou, but had come to get Keitarock. The next day she saw defendant and Whitman. Whitman took Rachal with her to the police station. Defendant said he was not going to the police station with them, and told them to say that they did not know anything and nothing would happen to them. She was concerned because the case involved gangs, and there were consequences from speaking to the police. Ultimately she identified defendant as the shooter.
2. Forensic and Physical Evidence.
Detective Gregory Stearns of the LAPD works out of the 77th Street Station, where in excess of 85 percent of homicides are gang-related. On November 10, 2004, 10 days after the shooting, he executed search warrants at defendant’s residence and Whitman’s residence. The police recovered a .38 caliber revolver and ammunition and also recovered Federal Hydrashock nine millimeter ammunition from a rear room. They did not find a nine millimeter gun at the house, although an orange jacket was recovered. The .38 revolver found was not the murder weapon.
Detective Stearns interviewed Lewis three days after the shooting and showed her a six-pack, from which she identified defendant. Rachal identified Hashim Cridell from a six-pack.
Stella Chu, a criminalist for the LAPD, examined two bullets, and concluded they were fired from the same .38 or .357 caliber weapon, although they were not fired from the weapon recovered from Whitman’s house. One of the bullets was consistent with the ammunition found at Whitman’s house. Steven Scholtz, forensic pathologist, testified the victim died from multiple gunshot wounds. There were three to four wounds; at least three were caused by separate bullets. Two of the wounds indicated the gun had been fired from the back. The victim’s body indicated he had been hit in the mouth and nose and he had injuries on his hands and knees. The injuries to the face were consistent with the victim being struck with a fist.
3. Expert Gang Testimony.
Officer David Ross and Officer Richard Mendoza of the LAPD testified concerning the Rolling 60s Neighborhood Crips. The Rolling 60s gang has an area that extends from Western Avenue to Hill Avenue and from 52nd Street to 77th Street. The gang’s territory abuts Florence Avenue. The Eight-Trey gang has territory that extends from Florence on the north to Century on the south, Vermont on the east, and Van Ness on the west.
The Rolling 60s are bitter enemies with the Eight-Trey Gang. If a Rolling 60s gang member enters Eight-Trey territory, the Eight-Trey gang would be required to maintain respect and control of their territory by assaulting or killing the enemy gang member. Gang members intimidate the community, are extremely territorial and use graffiti to mark their territory. Eight-Trey graffiti was found on a utility box near the intersection of 88th and Western demonstrating that the gang was active in the area.
Keith Parker, aka Keitarock, is a member of the Rolling 60s and a rapper. If Kietarock had been near the Déjà Blue Club, an Eight-Trey club located near the Motorcycle Club, he would have been recognized, upsetting the Eight-Trey gang.
B. Defense Evidence.
William (Michael) Bell is not a gang member. Although the chronology of events he reported is not always clear, he testified that he was at the crime scene at the time of the shooting. He was initially considered a suspect because of the bloodstains on his shirt. Bell was interviewed by police shortly after the shooting. Bell told the police that although he did not know Cridell, who is also known as “Cripto,” he spoke to Cridell shortly after midnight on October 31, 2004. Cridell told him to stay off the streets because “somebody just got served (shot).” Cridell did not say who did the shooting. Bell denied telling police that Cridell had told him he had “served” someone. Bell identified Cridell from some photographs the police showed to him. At the time of the shooting, Bell had not slept for four or five days due to drug use. Bell told the police that Cridell had admitted to the shooting because Bell thought the police would pin it on him.
Detective Thomas Mathews interviewed Bell at the crime scene. Bell told him Cripto was a “90s Dude,” meaning a member of the Rolling 90s gang. Bell told Detective Mathews that Cridell had told him that Cridell had “served” somebody on 88th Street, which Bell told Detective Matthews he thought meant Cridell had shot someone. Bell identified Cripto’s photograph.
C. Rebuttal.
Detective Stearns interviewed Bell about a month after the shooting. Bell told him that as he was leaving the house early in the morning on October 31, 2004, Cridell came in and told him to be careful on the streets because “somebody just got served.” Lewis had identified Cripto from a photograph as one who looked most like the shooter, as had Rachal, although Rachal had not told him Cripto was at the scene.
Although Detective Mathews believed that members of the Rolling 90s would not frequent the area near the Motorcycle Club, such a gang member might venture into the territory for purposes of retaliation. Initially Detective Stearns took Cridell’s comment to be about the King Lou shooting. Lewis identified Cripto as being at the scene of the shooting, but did not say he was involved.
Detective Mendoza testified that Cridell is a member of the Rolling 90s Crips, and his moniker is Cripto. The Rolling 90s are aligned with the Rolling 60s; both gangs are Crip gangs. Based upon his experience, Detective Mendoza had never come across the situation where a Rolling 90 and an Eight-Trey got together to kill a Rolling 60s gang member; Rolling 90s and Eight-Treys were enemies. However, a person who was a member of the Rolling 90s gang would want to warn people to stay away from the area of a shooting immediately afterwards. Detective Mendoza hypothesized that if a Rolling 90s gang member learned of the homicide at 88th and Western, which the gang member knew to be an Eight-Trey neighborhood, they would be expecting a retaliatory killing of an Eight-Trey gang member. Therefore, the Rolling 90s member would warn off fellow gang members.
The jury found defendant was guilty of first degree murder, and found true firearm and gang allegations. (§§ 186.22, subd. (b)(1)(A); 12022.53, subds. (b), (c), (d)). The trial court sentenced defendant to 25 years to life on the murder conviction, and a consecutive sentence of 25 years to life on the firearm enhancement.
DISCUSSION
DETECTIVE MENDOZA’S TESTIMONY DID NOT AMOUNT TO
EXPERT OPINION THAT A THIRD PARTY WAS INNOCENT
Defendant’s defense was based upon the theory that a third party, Hashim Cridell, actually shot King Lou. In support of this theory, defendant relied upon Cridell’s statements that he had “served” (shot) somebody that night, and the fact that two eyewitnesses had selected Cridell’s photograph as a being a person who resembled the shooter. Defendant argues that Detective Mendoza’s testimony on gang behavior amounted to an expert opinion that Hashim Cridell could not have committed the shooting. Detective Mendoza testified that he (1) had never heard of a member of Cridell’s Rolling 90s gang getting together with an Eight-Trey to shoot a Rolling 60s gang member, and (2) a Rolling 90s would want to warn people to stay out an area where there had been a shooting. Defendant argues the testimony should have been prohibited as it was beyond the scope of expert testimony and amounted to an improper opinion that Cridell had not shot King Lou.
A. Factual Background.
During Detective Mendoza’s testimony, the prosecution inquired whether Detective Mendoza had heard of a Rolling 90 going to 88th and Western to kill a Rolling 60. Detective Mendoza responded, “Based on my experience . . . I have never heard of a Rolling 90 and an 8-Trey gang member getting together to kill – getting together to kill a [Rolling] 60. [] Like I mentioned before, the 8-Trey gangsters are mortal enemies with the Rolling 90[ ]s and the Rolling 60[s] neighborhood Crips.” Defendant did not object to this testimony.
The prosecution then asked “Is there a reason why an individual who witnessed – say an individual witnessed a shooting at the corner of 88th and Western, and let’s say that person is a Rolling 90[ ]s. Is there any reason why that person might want to warn people that they know frequent that area to stay out of that area in the time immediately after the shooting?” The defense objected, and the following colloquy was held:
THE COURT: “Let me ask you, I understand it’s a hypothetical drawn from the facts in this case, but is it really something that would be part of his expertise?”
THE PEOPLE: “Yeah, it would, Your Honor, because it goes to the issue of retaliation and what might be expected. If a gang member was killed in that area, there might be some kind of retaliation, and that might be why this particular person might want to warn people to stay out of that area, because of the possible retaliation.”
THE COURT: “Now – and I expect that’s the answer you expect him to give?”
THE PEOPLE: “Yes.”
THE COURT: “Go ahead.”
DEFENSE COUNSEL: “Well, if Mr. Bell was a Rolling 60 or a gang member, that might be something for him to consider, but [he is] just saying, in his opinion, he shouldn’t go there because there’s been a shooting isn’t saying there’s going to be retaliation or that there’s still people out there firing [and] shooting. [] You’re jumping to speculation as to what was going on. Cripto, when he supposedly made the statement to Mr. Bell --”
THE COURT: “I tell you what. I will overrule the objection. You can ask the question. You can cross-examine on it.”
The prosecution resumed questioning, inquiring whether Detective Mendoza knew of any reason “why a Rolling 90 would want to warn people to stay out of the area of 88th and Western immediately after a shooting? . . .” Detective Mendoza responded that “[I]f I am a member of the Rolling 90[ ]s, and I am aware that a homicide had just occurred on 88th and Western, and I know that area to be 8-Trey gangster or an 8-Trey gangster Crip neighborhood, and I am their mortal enemies, it’s common in the gang culture that a retaliation shooting is going to occur. [] I am assuming that [at] 88th and Western, somebody got killed, that’s probably an 8-Trey gang member that just got murdered, I am an enemy of the 8-Trey gang members, I know that retaliation is imminent, something’s going to happen, it’s common that, after these the particular gang gets victimized, they are going to retaliate on their rivals, I am going to warn everybody that I know, my fellow gang members, and different people in the area, ‘Hey, you need to stay off the street because everything’s not right right now.”
B. Discussion.
Evidence Code section 801 provides in relevant part: “If a witness is testifying as an expert, his testimony in the form of an opinion is limited to such an opinion as is: [] (a) Related to a subject that is sufficiently beyond common experience that the opinion of an expert would assist the trier of fact; . . .” An expert witness is “one who has special knowledge, skill, experience, training or education sufficient to qualify as an expert on the subject to which his or her testimony relates.” (People v. Killebrew (2002) 103 Cal.App.4th 644, 651.)
However, a witness may not express an opinion as to the defendant’s guilt or innocence. (People v. Torres (1995) 33 Cal.App.4th 37, 46-47.) This is not, as commonly asserted, because guilt is the ultimate issue of fact, because opinion testimony often goes to the ultimate issue in the case. (Id. at p. 47.) Rather, the rule is premised upon the belief that a witness’s opinion regarding the guilt or innocence of a defendant is of no assistance to the trier of fact. The “trier of fact is as competent as the witness to weigh the evidence and draw a conclusion on the issue of guilt.” (Ibid.)
We review a claim that an expert’s opinion was erroneously admitted for abuse of discretion. (People v. Smith (2003) 30 Cal.4th 581, 627.)
Here, contrary to defendant’s assertion, the expert testimony did not express an opinion of defendant’s guilt. Detective Mendoza expressed two opinions: that a Rolling 90s who had witnessed a shooting would warn fellow gang members to stay out of the area; and that a Rolling 90s would not cooperate with an Eight-Trey to shoot a Rolling 60s member. Defendant’s contention that this amounted to an opinion that Cridell’s statement was a warning, rather than an admission he had shot King Lou is without merit. Rather, the testimony provided information to the jury by explaining a likely basis for Cridell’s ambiguous statement and a hypothesis as to whether Cridell might have been at the scene of the shooting based on the relevant gang territorial rules. Detective Mendoza’s two opinions, taken together, do not necessarily compel the conclusion defendant suggests, but permit an inference that Cridell was warning of, rather than confessing to, the shooting. As such, the evidence was evidence the jury could use to determine whether the third party, Cridell, a member of the Rolling 90s, would shoot King Lou, a member of the Rolling 60s, in Eight-Trey gang territory. The evidence therefore did not directly address defendant’s innocence or guilt.
In any event, even if the trial court erroneously admitted the evidence, the error was harmless. An improperly admitted expert opinion does not result in a reversal if it is not reasonably probable the jury would have arrived at a different result had the opinion not been admitted. (People v. McFarland (2000) 78 Cal.App.4th 489, 496.) Two eyewitnesses testified they saw defendant shoot King Lou. On the other hand, the evidence concerning Cridell’s statement that somebody got “served” or that Cridell did the shooting on 88th Street was ambiguous and contradictory. Thus, it is not reasonably likely without the challenged evidence that the result at trial would have been different.

DISPOSITION
The judgment of the superior court is affirmed.
NOT TO BE PUBLISHED IN THE OFFICIAL REPORTS


ZELON, J.
We concur:


JOHNSON, Acting P. J. WOODS, J.
Trav
Middle Weight
Middle Weight
 
Posts: 595
Joined: July 21st, 2005, 8:45 pm
Location: CT
What city do you live in now?: the Bottom

Postby pistolslanga » May 24th, 2007, 8:37 pm

^

damn and keitarock still around just tryna get peace treaties goin im guessin
pistolslanga
Light Heavy Weight
Light Heavy Weight
 
Posts: 1342
Joined: May 5th, 2006, 2:04 pm
Location: oakland

Postby pistolslanga » May 26th, 2007, 1:55 pm

King Lou did some tracks with Poppa LQ also, Poppa LQ worked with CJ Mac also.
pistolslanga
Light Heavy Weight
Light Heavy Weight
 
Posts: 1342
Joined: May 5th, 2006, 2:04 pm
Location: oakland

Postby Trav » May 26th, 2007, 2:05 pm

pistolslanga wrote:King Lou did some tracks with Poppa LQ also, Poppa LQ worked with CJ Mac also.


Ain't CJ Mac from they hood too?
Trav
Middle Weight
Middle Weight
 
Posts: 595
Joined: July 21st, 2005, 8:45 pm
Location: CT
What city do you live in now?: the Bottom

Postby pistolslanga » May 26th, 2007, 3:24 pm

Trav wrote:
pistolslanga wrote:King Lou did some tracks with Poppa LQ also, Poppa LQ worked with CJ Mac also.


Ain't CJ Mac from they hood too?


CJ macs a hoodsta, king lou a hoodsta, keita rock a hoodsta, poppa LQ a hoodsta, kurupt a hoodsta * i think*... i know theres a couple more rappers, damn the 60s been in this rap game major
pistolslanga
Light Heavy Weight
Light Heavy Weight
 
Posts: 1342
Joined: May 5th, 2006, 2:04 pm
Location: oakland

Re: Keita Rock

Postby Redrag52 » June 6th, 2007, 5:06 pm

pistolslanga wrote:ive heard bout this guy a lil, he pops up here n there, ive heard like 1 of his tracks haha, sounds real dope, anyone got any info on him? some dudes was saying suge was scared of his ass or something when he was signed to deathrow and when he left, because suge was bullyin fools, but not touchin keita rock...anyone got any idea who he is?

song i heard by him is Keita Rock - Projects


they talk about my OG homie in that song triple OG studder Boxx .
Redrag52
Middle Weight
Middle Weight
 
Posts: 103
Joined: May 16th, 2007, 2:44 pm

Re: Keita Rock

Postby pistolslanga » June 6th, 2007, 5:31 pm

Redrag52 wrote:
pistolslanga wrote:ive heard bout this guy a lil, he pops up here n there, ive heard like 1 of his tracks haha, sounds real dope, anyone got any info on him? some dudes was saying suge was scared of his ass or something when he was signed to deathrow and when he left, because suge was bullyin fools, but not touchin keita rock...anyone got any idea who he is?

song i heard by him is Keita Rock - Projects


they talk about my OG homie in that song triple OG studder Boxx .


lil niggas like blood thats keita rock
he fukk wth the big homeboy studderbox
gyeah so back the fukk up because ya crampin my space
its that loc with the L.A. dodger face
pistolslanga
Light Heavy Weight
Light Heavy Weight
 
Posts: 1342
Joined: May 5th, 2006, 2:04 pm
Location: oakland

Postby Shox112 » June 6th, 2007, 7:48 pm

pistolslanga wrote:
Trav wrote:
pistolslanga wrote:King Lou did some tracks with Poppa LQ also, Poppa LQ worked with CJ Mac also.


Ain't CJ Mac from they hood too?


CJ macs a hoodsta, king lou a hoodsta, keita rock a hoodsta, poppa LQ a hoodsta, kurupt a hoodsta * i think*... i know theres a couple more rappers, damn the 60s been in this rap game major


they deep so how could u expect them not to be, but then again niggaz from my hood aint got on b'cuz we too much 4 'em
User avatar
Shox112
Heavy Weight
Heavy Weight
 
Posts: 2189
Joined: September 13th, 2006, 12:08 am
Location: Watts

Postby Qdawg » June 6th, 2007, 7:52 pm

never heard of homeboy
Qdawg
Super Heavy Weight
Super Heavy Weight
 
Posts: 3926
Joined: December 20th, 2005, 4:42 pm
Location: Bx,ny-(secor houses) 2 bmore

Postby Shox112 » June 6th, 2007, 7:56 pm

Qdawg wrote:never heard of homeboy
he a g from 60's...by the way pistolslanga kurupt is a 60, and daz is a Long Beach 20
User avatar
Shox112
Heavy Weight
Heavy Weight
 
Posts: 2189
Joined: September 13th, 2006, 12:08 am
Location: Watts

Postby pistolslanga » June 6th, 2007, 8:03 pm

Shox112 wrote:
Qdawg wrote:never heard of homeboy
he a g from 60's...by the way pistolslanga kurupt is a 60, and daz is a Long Beach 20


aw, kurupt always used to be with snoop n daz n shit, made it seem like he was with 20s n shit, + his tracks with tray deee

but gyeah 60s is deep but i hear they got lotta busters?
pistolslanga
Light Heavy Weight
Light Heavy Weight
 
Posts: 1342
Joined: May 5th, 2006, 2:04 pm
Location: oakland

Postby Qdawg » June 6th, 2007, 8:24 pm

[quote="Shox112"][quote="Qdawg"]never heard of homeboy[/quote] he a g from 60's...by the way pistolslanga kurupt is a 60, and daz is a Long Beach 20[/quote]

he come out with alotta mixtapes/underground cd's over there?
Qdawg
Super Heavy Weight
Super Heavy Weight
 
Posts: 3926
Joined: December 20th, 2005, 4:42 pm
Location: Bx,ny-(secor houses) 2 bmore

Postby Shox112 » June 7th, 2007, 12:34 am

Keita roccc just a known nigga around the hood like Harry-O from BH and Big Hauncho from my hood
User avatar
Shox112
Heavy Weight
Heavy Weight
 
Posts: 2189
Joined: September 13th, 2006, 12:08 am
Location: Watts

Re: Keita Rock

Postby Redrag52 » June 7th, 2007, 5:56 am

pistolslanga wrote:
Redrag52 wrote:
pistolslanga wrote:ive heard bout this guy a lil, he pops up here n there, ive heard like 1 of his tracks haha, sounds real dope, anyone got any info on him? some dudes was saying suge was scared of his ass or something when he was signed to deathrow and when he left, because suge was bullyin fools, but not touchin keita rock...anyone got any idea who he is?

song i heard by him is Keita Rock - Projects


they talk about my OG homie in that song triple OG studder Boxx .


lil niggas like blood thats keita rock
he #%@& wth the big homeboy studderbox
gyeah so back the #%@& up because ya crampin my space
its that loc with the L.A. dodger face


yeah thats my Big homie , he a Triple OG named Studder Boxx from the pueblos bishop ,
Redrag52
Middle Weight
Middle Weight
 
Posts: 103
Joined: May 16th, 2007, 2:44 pm

Re:

Postby babystreetz60 » March 13th, 2011, 10:25 am

Trav wrote:I'm ain't from Cali so you would have to ask one of them niggaz. I got some fam in la thats how i know a little bit. But dude look like an OG Spider Loc refered to dude as an OG before. The shit with the 8 Trays is in one of these forums somewhere, search and it got every detail on what happened that night. He from the 60's put i guess he ain't on that shit no more cause he atleast use to try to get peace treaties poppin. But i guess he did so much in the streets niggaz ain't givin a fu-- and still tryin to body him.

dats the big homie from the 60s n spider loc ant no og dats his big brother big spider cuzz spider loc is a bg so he baby spider loc
babystreetz60
Newbie
Newbie
 
Posts: 1
Joined: March 13th, 2011, 10:12 am
Country: United States
If in the United States: Arkansas
What city do you live in now?: Los Angeles


Return to Music and News



Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests